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Apple Music has a new tool to help young people with speech-sound disorders

Apple Music on iPhone
Apple Music on iPhone (Image credit: iMore)

What you need to know

  • Apple has a new tool to help young people with speech-sound disorders.
  • Saylists is an Apple Music feature that collects songs that repeat challenging sounds.
  • It's based on an algorithm from Warner Music.

A new Apple Music feature called Saylists has been launched to help young people with speech-sound disorders.

As reported by BBC:

"Saylists" are being launched on Apple Music to help young people with speech-sound disorders.The project, from Warner Music, uses algorithms to find song lyrics that repeat challenging sounds.The 173 tracks chosen so far include Dua Lipa's Don't Start Now, Lizzo's Good As Hell and Right Here, Fatboy Slim's Right Now.One in 12 children in the UK is believed to experience some form of speech-sound disorder (SSD).

The report says that "one of the most successful SSD therapies" is repeating challenging sounds such as "ch..." and "d...". The new algorithm analyses the lyrics of the entire Apple Music library, collating them into a playlist of songs that use the most challenging sounds most often. A speech and language therapist who worked on the project said "Saylists provide a fun new way to practise the sounds I teach children, without feeling pressured or getting bored", whilst Warner Music chief Tony Harlow said, "Helping people express themselves is at the heart of what we do - and we hope that by creating a therapeutic tool that's as engaging and accessible as saylists, we can help anyone whose struggling with their speech."

173 tracks have reportedly been chosen so far.

A new report last week says Apple plans to bring a new 'City Charts' feature to Apple Music, showing you the top songs in 100 cities around the world.

Stephen Warwick
News Editor

Stephen Warwick has written about Apple for five years at iMore and previously elsewhere. He covers all of iMore's latest breaking news regarding all of Apple's products and services, both hardware and software. Stephen has interviewed industry experts in a range of fields including finance, litigation, security, and more. He also specializes in curating and reviewing audio hardware and has experience beyond journalism in sound engineering, production, and design.

Before becoming a writer Stephen studied Ancient History at University and also worked at Apple for more than two years. Stephen is also a host on the iMore show, a weekly podcast recorded live that discusses the latest in breaking Apple news, as well as featuring fun trivia about all things Apple.

1 Comment
  • Not fair Spotify has to pay 30% to apple and still compete on it's platform.