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The Apple Teacher program

There are a few things Apple does that represent the very best in technology companies. Swift Playgrounds is one example. The Apple Teacher program (opens in new tab) is another.

We designed the Apple Teacher program to help you build skills and stay inspired. You'll discover new ways to enhance creativity and productivity by unlocking the magic of iPad, Mac, and built-in apps. You'll get news and fresh ideas, featuring real stories, product tips, and great educational apps. And after completing online quizzes, you'll receive an official Apple Teacher logo that you can share with the world.

So far, the reception seems good. From the Barrington 220 School District:

Joe Robinson, our Director of Instructional Technology, and I have completed the Apple Teacher program and both of us highly recommend it! We believe that this program is an excellent starting point for any teacher—and it reaffirms the skills of teachers with more technology integration experience with recognition. At the same time, the process for earning badges is set up to suggest classroom activities for even advanced Apple technology users. Teachers can choose to pursue either iPad or Mac training paths—or complete them both.

Support is also being offered from professional learning organizations, like EdTechTeam:

Building upon the Apple Teacher Starter Guides, these professional learning experiences introduce key features and skills on iPad and Mac, such as using Magic Move in Keynote to visualize change over time, Instant Alpha in Pages to create beautiful visuals that focus on the subject of a student report, and workflows for getting organized or telling compelling stories using multiple apps. Participants also explore the new real-time collaboration features in iWork, allowing them to collaboratively edit documents with colleagues and students.

Yes, sure, all these things also help enmesh educators in Apple's ecosystem, which is good for Apple. But self service is always best when coupled with public service.

If you know a teacher who's into Apple technology, send them to the Teacher program. If you're already involved with the Apple Teacher program, let me know what you think!

Rene Ritchie
Contributor

Rene Ritchie is one of the most respected Apple analysts in the business, reaching a combined audience of over 40 million readers a month. His YouTube channel, Vector, has over 90 thousand subscribers and 14 million views and his podcasts, including Debug, have been downloaded over 20 million times. He also regularly co-hosts MacBreak Weekly for the TWiT network and co-hosted CES Live! and Talk Mobile. Based in Montreal, Rene is a former director of product marketing, web developer, and graphic designer. He's authored several books and appeared on numerous television and radio segments to discuss Apple and the technology industry. When not working, he likes to cook, grapple, and spend time with his friends and family.

7 Comments
  • I am a teacher and have been a heavy user of Apple products for years. I have been involved in technology since I was a child and I'm now in my 40s. Macs, Apple TVs and iOS devices have immeasurably added to my teaching prowess. I only wish my current school district (Wake County Schools in North Carolina) wasn't so unbelievably anti-Apple. They force expensive Lenovo stink pads upon us, yet totally lock them down and use them as if they were chrome books. Microsoft Office isn't even installed on these "laptops". iPads would've been much cheaper to implement and use if all they wanted was for us to have browsing devices that are destined to solely access websites and web apps. It is very discouraging, and I wish I could make use of Apple teaching resources and programs, but it would be like bashing my head against the wall.
  • "Lenovo stink pads" was the best you could come up with? Really? Sometimes, it's the user that's the problem. The first lesson in being a teacher is to learn.
  • http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/now-three-pre-installed-malwares-lenovo-lap...
  • Chromebooks would be the most cost effective option if web browsing is your sole intent, plus more and more are allowing apps to be downloaded.
  • +1
  • Good to see Apple are making progress in this area after the Pearson / LAUSD fiasco. Posted via the iMore App
  • I've been a teacher for 10 years and was inducted into the 2015 class of Apple Diatinguished Educators. This programme has been in circulation since 1994 and takes in new members every two years from all corners of the globe. While not as open as the Apple Teacher it does give teachers who are transforming learning and teaching g through the use of technology a platform to meet and collaborate with likeminded individuals from the across the world. Apple Teacher seems like a good idea at the moment but is US only for the moment. It will be coming to other areas soon and I'd imagine would be a good way for teachers using teachnololgy; a platform to assess their current pedagogy and share their success. Apple haven't suddenly realised they need to support teachers; this has been something they have done for 40yeaes. John D. Couch being hire number 9(??) and a former teacher. Will Apple Teacher will do is allow every teacher using Apple products, Mac and iOS a chance to share success and empower learning through technology. Sent from the iMore App