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Clubhouse is testing in-room party games to help get people talking

Clubhouse app
Clubhouse app (Image credit: Bryan M. Wolfe / iMore)

What you need to know

  • Clubhouse is testing new mini-games to get people talking in rooms.
  • A new mini-game asks a series of questions to prompt conversation.
  • Clubhouse is the original live voice app but faces competition from Spotify and Twitter.

Live voice chat app Clubhouse is testing a new feature that will allow people to play party games in-app, according to a new report.

The feature, confirmed to TechCrunch by Clubhouse, will see people take part in mini-games in an attempt to get people to talk to one another. An ice-breaker of sorts, one example game is called Wild Cards and will ask people a series of questions designed to get the conversation started.

Clubhouse provided a list of questions that may be asked during the game. For example, you may be asked to pitch your best idea for a movie or series in 60 seconds. Or, you may be asked to try to find a movie that the whole group loves in three minutes or less. Other questions may ask you to share the last five things in your search history or explain what type of dog matches your personality.

Clubhouse Wild Cards

Clubhouse Wild Cards (Image credit: Clubhouse)

The new feature arrives soon after Clubhouse also added support for dark mode and as Spotify has rebranded its Spotify Greenroom competitor. Live chat apps, particularly Clubhouse, rose to prominence in the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic and have since proven to be less popular among some users.

Despite competition from Spotify and Twitter, Clubhouse does still remain one of the best iPhone apps for those who want to take part in live voice chats. The app can be downloaded from the App Store (opens in new tab) now and is free for everyone.

Oliver Haslam
Oliver Haslam

Oliver Haslam has written about Apple and the wider technology business for more than a decade with bylines on How-To Geek, PC Mag, iDownloadBlog, and many more. He has also been published in print for Macworld, including cover stories. At iMore, Oliver is involved in daily news coverage and, not being short of opinions, has been known to 'explain' those thoughts in more detail, too.

Having grown up using PCs and spending far too much money on graphics card and flashy RAM, Oliver switched to the Mac with a G5 iMac and hasn't looked back. Since then he's seen the growth of the smartphone world, backed by iPhone, and new product categories come and go. Current expertise includes iOS, macOS, streaming services, and pretty much anything that has a battery or plugs into a wall. Oliver also covers mobile gaming for iMore, with Apple Arcade a particular focus. He's been gaming since the Atari 2600 days and still struggles to comprehend the fact he can play console quality titles on his pocket computer.