A hand holds up a white iPhone 7. The iOS Home app is running and shows HomeKit-enabled accessories in the person's kitchen.

NBC News published an empowering story about an IT consultant named Todd Stabelfeldt who uses Apple's HomeKit framework to live a more independent life. Stabelfeldt is a 38-year-old quadriplegic man who, as the result of an injury when he was eight years old, has had no movement below his shoulders for more than 30 years.

Using the HomeKit-enabled accessories in his self-titled, "Quadthedral" smart home, Stabelfeldt is able to leverage both Siri and Apple's Home app to go about his day:

Features like Apple's "Home" app allow Stabelfeldt to control a variety of smart accessories in his house — from door locks and window shades, to lights and his garage door. The best part for Stabelfeldt? He can command Apple's intelligent digital assistant Siri to work it all.

When he's not using his voice to control his smart home technology, Stabelfeldt makes use of Apple's Switch Control software which allows him to use special hardware for controlling iOS without the use of his hands.

It's really incredible seeing how Stabelfeldt has taken this technology and used it to not only increase his independence, but improve the way he works in his home. I encourage you to read the feature over on NBC News — it's a touching example of how tech can improve our lives and a reminder of what we sometimes take for granted. I think that sentiment is captured perfectly in what Apple's Sarah Herrlinger told NBC News:

For some people, doing something like turning on your lights or opening a blind or changing your thermostat might be seen as a convenience, but for others, that represents empowerment, and independence, and dignity.

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