Webkit

WebKit spools up FTL, seeks to make JavaScript even faster

WebKit, the open source rendering engine that powers Apple's Safari and is the basis of most mobile browsers today, is looking to once again escalate its level of JavaScript performance. Dubbed FTL — not "faster than light" but "fourth tier LLVM" — it's now spooled up and ready jump onto OS X and iOS. Filip Pizlo expounds in glorious, deeply nerdy fashion on the Surfing Safari blog:

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Debug 25: Vicki Murley on evanglizing Safari and CSS transforms

Vicki Murley, former Safari Technology Evangelist at Apple, current founder of Sprightly Books, talks to Guy and Rene about web technologies, speaking at conferences, and beating Dan Brown at the book game.

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Google forks WebKit, announces new Blink rendering engine

Google has announced that they're forking the Apple-led open source WebKit to create their own, new Blink HTML rendering engine. According to the Chromium blog:

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Debug 11: Don Melton and Safari

Don Melton, former Engineering Director of Internet Technologies at Apple, talks to Guy and Rene about assembler on the Apple II, open-sourcing Mozilla, building Nautilus, creating WebKit and the Safari browser, teaching bears to dance, and cleaning cusses from code bases.

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The rise of WebKit browsers, and the fear of IE6-style stagnation

Now that Opera has announced they'll be switching from their Presto HTML rendering engine to WebKit, the open source engine rendering engine Apple forked from KHTML, there's been some concern that having such a dominant technology could one again lead to the type of browser stagnation we suffered under Microsoft and Internet Explorer 6 (IE6). Indeed, Safari on iOS and OS X, Google's Chrome, Palm's webOS, BlackBerry's Torch, and others have all based themselves on WebKit. Writing on Hypercritical, however, John Siracusa thinks the parallel doesn't hold:

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No Safaris left to conquer

Don Melton on why, when he looked upon the breadth of his WebKit and Safari work at Apple, he retired:

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How the Safari browser started life as Alexander and hid itself from the world

Don Melton, who was originally tasked by Scott Forstall to create WebKit and the Safari browser for OS X, and later WebKit of iOS, has retired from his job as engineering director of internet technologies, and begun writing. One of his writing projects is a blog, and two of his recent posts shed some light on the people and events behind Safari.

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Apple details security updates covered in iOS 5.1.1 update

Apple has released information on the security updates that were covered in the recent release of iOS 5.1.1. When it was originally released yesterday, all that we knew was that there were various bug fixes. This update actually covers some important security fixes too for Mobile Safari and WebKit based browsers in general.

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Dolphin Browser HD now available for iPad

Hot on the heels of last month’s Dolphin Browser for iPhone release, we now have Dolphin Browser HD. As is always the case with browser apps, Dolphin has to use the built-in iOS web view for rendering pages, so it has the same HTML, CSS, and JavaScript engine as Safari, but they do a good job of differentiating themselves via their interface and features.

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BlackBerry opposing Apple's WebKit trademark filing

BlackBerry maker RIM is opposing Apple's trademark filing for WebKit, the open source browser rendering engine they developer based on Linux Konquerer/KHTML. WebKit has become the most popular browser engine in Mobile, powering iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad Safari, as well as BlackBerry's Torch Mobile, Google's Android, Palm's webOS, and other browsers -- as well as Apple Safari and Google Chrome on PCs. So popular, in fact, that RIM couldn't wait to advertise they'd finally joined the modern internet by getting a WebKit browser.

Could that be part of the reason for the opposition, fears that Apple would try to restrict use of the trademark? Even CrackBerry.com doesn't seem to know for sure.

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