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Apple considering using Titanium in future iPads, says Digitimes

iPad Pro 2021 review
iPad Pro 2021 review (Image credit: Daniel Bader / iMore)

What you need to know

  • Apple might be considering using Titanium chassis for its future iPads.
  • That's according to sources quoted by Digitimes.
  • A new report says that currently, the tech is too expensive.

A new report claims that Apple is considering using Titanium chassis for future iPads, but that the tech isn't economical enough for use right now.

Digitimes reports:

The new iPad will also equip with aluminum-alloy chassis that will be processed by PVD. The sources also revealed that Apple is also considering equipping iPads with titanium-based metal chassis, but the high costs for doing so may not be economical at the moment.

The snippet comes in the context of a report about Apple's rumored new ninth-generation iPad, which Digitimes says will launch in September and help Apple ship 60 million iPad units this year:

Apple's 9th-generation inexpensive iPad slated for launch in September may not come with significant design changes, but is still expected to boost Apple's overall iPad shipments to as many as 60 million units this year, according to industry sources...

Rumors indicate Apple plans to unveil a new base-model iPad with a thinner form factor and a new processor, from Mark Gurman earlier this week:

In a new Power On video for Bloomberg, Gurman listed planned upgrades and expectations for Apple's iPhone 13, new AirPods, and a new iPad mini, as well as plans for a new ninth-generation iPad:... as well as a new ninth-generation iPad, geared towards students, with a thinner form factor and faster processor.

Digitimes notes that Apple is only "considering" Titanium at this stage and that the technology isn't economical to go to market yet. Given the expense, it seems reasonable that Apple might first offer Titanium in a premium device like the iPad Pro, currently one of Apple's best iPads.

Stephen Warwick
Stephen Warwick

Stephen Warwick has written about Apple for five years at iMore and previously elsewhere. He covers all of iMore's latest breaking news regarding all of Apple's products and services, both hardware and software. Stephen has interviewed industry experts in a range of fields including finance, litigation, security, and more. He also specializes in curating and reviewing audio hardware and has experience beyond journalism in sound engineering, production, and design.

Before becoming a writer Stephen studied Ancient History at University and also worked at Apple for more than two years. Stephen is also a host on the iMore show, a weekly podcast recorded live that discusses the latest in breaking Apple news, as well as featuring fun trivia about all things Apple.

1 Comment
  • Can't someone run the strength and stiffness numbers to see if this is likely and what the gains might be? Sporting equipment offers a comparison. Steel, titanium, aluminum, and composite bikes exist for example. All the metals used are alloys, i.e., combinations of metals. Steel is an iron-based alloy. Composites are a combination of plastic matrix and usually carbon fibers (graphite epoxy is and example)..