First Chevy models with CarPlay start rolling off the line

2016 Chevrolet Cruze Apple CarPlay
2016 Chevrolet Cruze Apple CarPlay (Image credit: Chevrolet)

The first 2016 Chevy models with Apple's CarPlay dashboard system have started rolling off the line and shipping out to dealers. The rollout was led by the 2016 Chevy Corvette Z06. The new vehicles also feature the latest version of Chevy's own MyLink system, from which CarPlay is accessible.

From TechCrunch:

Chevy announced earlier this year it would be bringing Apple's CarPlay to production vehicles this year, and now those first cars with the infotainment feature from Apple are rolling off the line and going out to dealerships and consumers. The very first production Chevrolet with CarPlay installed was the silver, 650-HP Corvette Z06 pictured above and below, the company tells TechCrunch.

While the Corvette starts around $55,000, GM previously committed to launching CarPlay across a wide range of vehicles, including the $15,000 Chevy Spark. With CarPlay, drivers will be able to access certain features and apps from their iPhones without having to look away from the road. In order to use the system, you will need a device running iOS 7.1 or later.

Source: TechCrunch

Joseph Keller is the former Editor in Chief of iMore. An Apple user for almost 20 years, he spends his time learning the ins and outs of iOS and macOS, always finding ways of getting the most out of his iPhone, iPad, Apple Watch, and Mac.

4 Comments
  • So far I have heard the the Chevrolet and Cadillac divisions of GM are rolling out Car Play. I sure hope the Buick division follows suit.
  • While I'm not a GovMotors fanboy, I absolutely cannot stand Ford SYNC with Microcrap. Sync has been a disaster from day one and is a monumental waste of money, especially when you purchase Navigation. Please Ford, dump MS/Sync and get Apple to design the system.
  • I believe they already switched to Blackberry Sent from the iMore App
  • What are the chances that CarPlay will still be a useable feature by the time those cars are junked? The problem with putting computer technology into automobiles is that the tech updates every year but cars can last a decade or more and automakers refuse to update them once they are sold. For example: I have OnStar in my GM Denali. Too bad it uses analog cell signals and GM won't update it to use digital (not that I would pay for that service).