Benks Infinity Pro Magnetic iPad Stand review: Twist and shout

Rotating base makes up for a so-so hinge on the Benks Infinity Pro Magnetic iPad Stand.

Benks Infinity Pro Magnetic iPad Stand on a white dresser
(Image: © Gerald Lynch / Future)

iMore Verdict

The rotating base on the Benks Infinity Pro Magnetic iPad Stand makes it really easy to adjust on the fly, but its lower hinge is too weak to hold the iPad at acute angles.

Pros

  • +

    Lovely design and build materials

  • +

    Great rotating base

  • +

    Strong magnetic connection to iPad

Cons

  • -

    Base needs extra weight

  • -

    Lower hinge not great at acute angles

  • -

    Base rotations come with a loud clicking sound

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With iPads increasingly at home on our desks as a main computing device as much as they are portable workstations, having a good stand to keep them at the height and angle most comfortable for prolonged work sessions has become very important.

The Benks Infinity Pro Magnetic iPad Stand is the successor to the company’s Infinity Magnetic stand, and it comes with a big difference – whereas its predecessor’s base was fixed, the Infinity Pro Magnetic Stand’s base rotates. It’s an excellent addition, but a weak lower hinge limits its usefulness a tad.

We’ve been testing the model designed for the 12.9-inch iPad Pro, but Benks also offers models for the 11-inch iPad Pro, and the iPad Air 4 and 5. 

So, does this Benks model sit among the best stands for iPad Pro? Here’s what we think.

Benks Infinity Pro Magnetic iPad Stand on a white dresser

(Image credit: Gerald Lynch / Future)

Benks Infinity Pro Magnetic iPad Stand: Price and availability

The Benks Infinity Pro Magnetic iPad Stand is available now and can be bought directly from Benks (opens in new tab). There are a number of different models for different-sized iPads available at different prices:

  • iPad Pro 12.9: $95.99 / £79.99 
  • iPad Pro 11-inch: $85.99 / £70.99 
  • iPad Air 4 / 5: $85.99 / £70.99

It’s on the expensive side for an iPad stand, but the strong magnetic connection, solid aluminum build materials and rotating base help justify its price.

Before buying, make sure to check if your iPad is supported by the stand. So long as you get the right model, it will work with the iPad Pro 12.9-inch tablets from 2018, 2020, 2021 and 2022, iPad Pro 11-inch from 2018, 2020, 2021 and 2022, and iPad Air (4th and 5th generations). With magnet placement important, make sure you’re picking up the right stand for your iPad.

Benks Infinity Pro Magnetic iPad Stand on a white dresser

(Image credit: Gerald Lynch / Future)

Benks Infinity Pro Magnetic iPad Stand: What’s good?

The Benks Infinity Pro Magnetic iPad Stand is a really good looking stand. Made from aluminum, it’s a great match for Apple’s recent, angular iPad Pro lineup, with the Space Gray finish fit to have come from Cupertino’s own design teams.

There’s a lot of flexibility to the way the Infinity Pro stand can be positioned. First, the tablet magnetically clips to a top panel that can be fully rotated between landscape and portrait orientations. This panel itself sits on a hinge that can be tilted to a viewing angle of your choosing (Benks recommends between 0 and 60-degrees). And it’s all connected to an arm that can elevate your iPad about 19cm, itself on a hinge (that Benks recommends setting between 55 and 75-degrees).

Benks Infinity Pro Magnetic iPad Stand on a white dresser

(Image credit: Gerald Lynch / Future)

It’s the base the arm is attached to that sets the Infinity Pro apart, though. A circular slab of aluminum, it rotates with a click through a full 360-degrees, letting you turn the iPad incredibly easily while keeping it in place thanks to a non-slip rubberised layer on the bottom of the stand. It’s incredibly useful, especially in an office setting where you quickly want to turn your iPad display to a colleague. 

It’s fairly portable, too. The Infinity Pro Magnetic iPad Stand collapses down and folds relatively flat, though the metals used in its construction means it still weighs quite a lot. You’re looking at 860g for the 12.9-inch model, and 720g for the smaller options.

Benks Infinity Pro Magnetic iPad Stand on a white dresser

(Image credit: Gerald Lynch / Future)

Still, if that weight has gone into the magnets, it’s been put to good use. The magnetic connection between the back panel and the iPad is incredibly strong — it runs no risk of sliding off, and will require a firm two-handed grip to remove, which is great.

Benks Infinity Pro Magnetic iPad Stand: What’s not so good?

If the magnets are strong, that lower hinge could do with some strengthening up. It’s not bad — at less extreme angles it's able to support the iPad’s weight with ease and, so long as you don’t go more acute than Benks’s recommended 55-degrees, all will be fine.

Benks Infinity Pro Magnetic iPad Stand on a white dresser

(Image credit: Gerald Lynch / Future)

However, if you’re an arty type who uses the Apple Pencil for lots of drawing, you’ll likely want to position the iPad closer to your desk’s surface at a more acute angle. Here’s where the Benks Infinity Pro Magnetic iPad Stand isn’t so great — the hefty weight of the iPad sees the arm eventually lower itself of its own accord, and the base tip upwards, losing stability.

In the past we grumbled about the Lululook Foldable Magnetic Stand’s lower hinge being almost too stiff to move easily, and so I want to be careful to clarify that there must be a happy medium somewhere in between the two. 

Benks Infinity Pro Magnetic iPad Stand on a white dresser

(Image credit: Gerald Lynch / Future)

In the case of the Benks model, some of the issue might be relieved had there been more weight in that rotating base. If it was a bit heavier, it might prevent the stand from tipping when the larger iPad is placed at an acute angle. But for now you’re going to have to live with the base leaning upwards and losing its stability if you use the stand with the iPad positioned low towards the surface.

Finally, while I personally quite liked the way the rotating base clicked as it turned, everyone else around me said it was quite noisy and annoying. So keep that in mind if you’re using it in a shared workspace.

Benks Infinity Pro Magnetic iPad Stand: Competition

There are plenty of options out there when it comes to iPad stands, even if few offer the same level of flexibility and rotation as this Benks stand. 

Lululook Foldable Magnetic iPad Stand on a bedside table with iPad Pro

An alternative: the Lululook Foldable Magnetic iPad Stand (Image credit: Gerald Lynch / Future)

As previously mentioned, the Lululook Foldable Magnetic Stand (pictured above) is a great, sturdy option at a similar price point, though it lacks the rotating base. If you’re after a stand with more fixed positioning, check out Lululook’s Urban Magnetic iPad Stand, too.

We’ve also previously enjoyed using the MagFlött, the Twelve South Compass Pro, Twelve South HoverBar Duo and Satechi's Desktop Stand. All are similarly well placed for propping your iPad up.

Benks Infinity Pro Magnetic iPad Stand: Should you buy it?

Buy the Benks Infinity Pro Magnetic iPad Stand if…

  • You intend to use your iPad regularly at a desk
  • You want the security and ease of use that a strong magnetic connection offers
  • You think the ability to quickly turn your iPad on the stand’s base will be useful to your workflow

Don’t buy the Benks Infinity Pro Magnetic iPad Stand if…

  • Your iPad does not have a magnetic back
  • You want a stand that lets you securely place the iPad at a low, acute angle
  • You work where the base’s clicking sound will annoy your neighbors

Benks Infinity Pro Magnetic iPad Stand on a white dresser

(Image credit: Gerald Lynch / Future)

Benks Infinity Pro Magnetic iPad Stand: Verdict

There’s lots to love about the Benks Infinity Pro Magnetic iPad Stand. It’s built with premium materials, can be folded down for easy storage or remote working, has a great array of positions and angles it can be set at, and is a nice match for Apple’s own hardware.

It’d be perfect, were it not for that lower hinge, which prevents the iPad from being locked into a comfortable, secure position at lower angles. That may be a deal-breaker for artists looking to use the stand for sketching positions with an Apple Pencil. That niche use case aside, it’s easy to recommend, provided you’re looking to stand your iPad tall and proud.

Gerald Lynch
Editor in Chief

Gerald Lynch is the Editor-in-Chief of iMore, keeping careful watch over the site's editorial output and commercial campaigns, ensuring iMore delivers the in-depth, accurate and timely Apple content its readership deservedly expects. You'll never see him without his iPad Pro, and he loves gaming sessions with his buddies via Apple Arcade on his iPhone 14 Pro, but don't expect him to play with you at home unless your Apple TV is hooked up to a 4K HDR screen and a 7.1 surround system. 


Living in London in the UK, Gerald was previously Editor of Gizmodo UK, and Executive Editor of TechRadar, and has covered international trade shows including Apple's WWDC, MWC, CES and IFA. If it has an acronym and an app, he's probably been there, on the front lines reporting on the latest tech innovations. Gerald is also a contributing tech pundit for BBC Radio and has written for various other publications, including T3 magazine, GamesRadar, Space.com, Real Homes, MacFormat, music bible DIY, Tech Digest, TopTenReviews, Mirror.co.uk, Brandish, Kotaku, Shiny Shiny and Lifehacker. Gerald is also the author of 'Get Technology: Upgrade Your Future', published by Aurum Press, and also holds a Guinness world record on Tetris. For real.