Our hopes and dreams for the third generation of Apple Watch software.

Last June, only a few months after the original shipped, Apple surprised us by introducing the second generation of watchOS, the software that runs the Apple Watch. If this World Wide Developer Conference turns out to be anything like that one, we could well see watchOS 3.0. What fixes and new features could it bring, and what could it mean for the future of computers on our wrists? Here's what iMore's editors would love to see come WWDC 2016!

What do you want to see from watch faces 3.0 in general?


Serenity

Custom watch faces, please! Third-party complications were a huge step in the right direction, but I still dislike that the Modular face is pretty much the only one I can use and enjoy multiple complications. (I dream of having complications on the Photo face. Or moving the gigantic upper-left Time complication.)

This is only tangentially related to watch faces, but I'd also love a way of enabling the Power Reserve watch face without having to shut down the rest of the watch and reboot if you want to return to regular use. Something along the lines of Nightstand mode, perhaps?


Bader

I think Apple did a great job providing a near-infinite amount of customization within the confines of its existing watch faces, but colors and complications alone are not enough. A small, vetted selection of third-party faces would be preferable, in my opinion, to an open market a la Pebble and Android Wear, but it would be nice to see the ecosystem opened up to the amazing and creative designers who love and use Apple products every day.

As an analog watch face aficionado, I'd like to see alternative font choices to San Francisco which, while great, is just one of myriad options that would look great on the Apple Watch's OLED display.


Lory

If we don't get the ability to add third-party custom watch faces, I at least want more motion-based ones from Apple. I love the flower, jellyfish, and butterfly watch faces, but that gets old after a couple of days. I'd like to see some slow-motion paint explosions or fireballs. The time lapse watch faces are way too limited, too. Why are they all wide shot landscape views? How about a time lapse of a plant growing in the forest or a baby chick breaking out of its shell?


Mikah

I've got to agree with my colleagues here: Give me third-party watch faces or give me … uh, third-party watch faces. Right now I alternate between two faces: Utility and Modular. Utility is my "fancy" choice and Modular is my day-to-day choice, because it gives me a good amount of customization options. But that gigantic, honking date section on the Modular face just breaks my heart. I want more detailed control.

Other than that, it sure would be nice to have an always-on watch face — even if it was just the time.


Gartenberg

custom watch faces would be welcome, there are infinite combinations but they tend to get boring after a bit. I suspect 3rd parties would love to create and sell new properties. Also would like to enable a low power mode so I can at least keep time going when things get low without shutting down. A few more digital faces would be nice too.


Georgia

More customization, including the amount of complications and colors I can choose from. I think if Apple would open the SDK to custom watch faces, we'd get a wider range of options faster. People do many different things for home and for work, and it would be great to have more options and control over the style of watch face on our wrists.

If it's too much to manage on the Watch itself, the Watch for iPhone app would be a great place to let us further customize colors and styles.


Rene

A licensed Superman watch face. What? It worked for Mickey! Okay, fine. I'd love to see more digital watch faces. Analog has had most of the love to date. I'd especially like to see a decent amount of complications for the Photo, Albums, and Time Lapse watch faces.

Most of all, it'd be great if Apple could figure out a power-efficient way to do ambient time. Having to turn my wrist to turn on the time just isn't a terrific experience.

How about complications specifically?


Serenity

Complications are the unsung heroes of watchOS app development, and I love them. I am hoping watchOS figures out a way to allow them to refresh more frequently, however: If you don't open the app, third-party complications have a tendency to stick on old data — not too helpful for a weather notice!


Bader

As of watchOS 2.0, I am happy with the state of complications, though battery constraints often mar the experience on more time-sensitive options like real-time weather or sports updates.

And should complications evolve further, I'd love to see an option to switch to the compatible Glance instead of opening the full app. For sports scores especially, having to wait for the app to open is more often than not a test of patience; skipping directly to a pre-programmed Glance could speed up that interaction considerably.


Lory

I'm fairly satisfied with the complications that Apple has built into watchOS. I can set a timer, check the weather, see my calendar, and more right on my watch face. I'd like to be able to add complications to more of the faces, though. There is no reason I shouldn't be able to see if I have a new email on the Photos face. I'd also like to see more third-party developers create complications. I think it would be fun to see what kinds of creative things they could come up with.


Mikah

It'd be nice if complications were just a tad more powerful. Right now they mostly serve up information and act as a shortcut to full watchOS apps. Wouldn't it be cool if I could lift my wrist, tap a complication on my watch face, and trigger the August Smart Lock on my front door? Yes, yes it would. Same goes for other smart home tech — I'd love to have a complication that triggers my favorite Philips Hue scene.


Gartenberg

I'm ok with complications at the moment. Adding too much here would well be, complicated. That said a little more flexibility about where complications can be used would be great.


Georgia

More of them. =)


Rene

I love complications. In addition to what I mentioned above about wanting more complications on the Photos, Albums, and Time Lapse faces, I'm curious as to how far Apple can take them.

More than apps or glances, complications feel like the natural state of information delivery on Watch to me. They're already dynamic, could they become interactive? Could they pop and peek? I'm really not sure. I just know I want more.

How could notifications be improved for you?


Serenity

More input below the Dismiss button! My favorite notification implementation right now is Duo, a two-step authentication app that actually pushes an Approve button to your watch when you request access from certain integrated sites. It's brilliant and one of the best examples I can think of when it comes to smart, quick two-step authentication.


Bader

I love the idea of intelligently grouping notifications together. For example, today, if I get a number of Slack notifications together, Apple Watch will send them individually and then bundle them into a useless, "You have 2 Slack notifications." I want the Watch to know that I want to read them inline, in a format that makes sense for the small display.

I want to see more information from individual notifications, too, with greater consistency between actionable notifications. It doesn't merely work to mirror actionable notifications from the phone on the watch, since there are times I want to do more on the wrist — otherwise I'll just take out my phone.

Instagram is a great example of this: if I have a post notification, the phone gives me the option of liking the photo without opening the app, but due to constraints around banner notifications, doesn't show the actual photo. When that notification is forwarded to the Apple Watch, I get the same choices, even though the display could easily show me a preview of the image. Little improvements like that would turn notifications from a killer feature to an immortal one.


Lory

Notifications on Apple Watch are its most useful feature. That being said, it still needs a bit of work. I'd like to be able to do more than just mirror notifications from third-party apps. I'd also like more customization options for the native Apple Apps. For example, I'd like to customize the sound and haptic alerts for some of my contacts the same way I can with text messages on my iPhone.


Mikah

YES, LORY, YES! Back when the Apple Watch was still just a rumor, I remember people talking about how the custom vibration alerts on iOS were a hint at what Apple would do with the Watch. I set up custom vibration alerts for my most-talked-to contacts and — in preparation for the Watch — took the time to learn their vibration patterns. Sadly, the Apple Watch didn't offer custom vibrations for individual contacts, so it was a pointless exercise … unless Apple adds custom vibrations to the next version of watchOS.

Aside from that, I concur with my colleagues: I wouldn't mind having more (and more nuanced) control over my notifications.


Gartenberg

notifications are definitely one of the key features I use all the time. I agree on more granularity, if I need to take out my phone to see all the details, watch hasn't done that much for me.


Georgia

I'm good with notifications. They're easy to use and see.


Rene

Notifications on the Watch are already a killer feature. To make them even more killer, I'd like to see Apple take the VIP concept from Mail and make it contact-based and system wide. That way it's not all or nothing for messages, for example.

If someone is VIP, I want to see their mail, their instant messages, their DMs — anything and everything they send me — and if they're not. I don't. Give me that and I'll be way happier.

Group-by-group controls would be interesting as well. That way I could turn on "work" during the day, "friends and family" on weekends, "vip" all the time, etc.

What would you like to see done with glances?


Serenity

Ugh, I don't know. I use just four glances: the System glance (where the eternally-useful Ping My iPhone button lives), Heart Rate, Music, and Carrot Weather (the sole third-party glance). I really don't like how most watch apps work, and I feel like glances could be a really good way of splitting the difference between full apps and complications… but right now I just don't use them — or even think to use them, which is the real problem.


Bader

Glances are great, in theory. But like the apps they're wrapped up in, they're too slow to load. Worse, cycling between them is a chore, especially when their numbers grow to above ten.

I feel like Glances as an idea should have waited until the Apple Watch's hardware was capable of matching its software's ambition.


Lory

I'd like them to work better. I only have three Glances set on my Apple Watch because most of them load too slow, or don't load at all. I used to have the Weather Glance, but it rarely worked without me first opening the full app, defeating the purpose of using a Glance at all. They need to load faster and show correct information without needing to take extra steps.


Mikah

Honestly, I have no idea. I don't use glances. No, wait, I take that back. I use two glances: the Settings glance and the Music control glance. I guess what I'm saying is Apple could do whatever the hell they want with glances and I'd be none the wiser.

I think Daniel's probably right: If glances didn't take so long to load, I might be more likely to use them … might.


Gartenberg

I keep glances lean at the moment. For the most part the apps are just too slow to refresh quickly enough to be useful. Speeding up performance would be great as would clear UI guidelines as to how best display content


Georgia

I primarily use glances to find my iPhone. I love being able to ping it. I love it so much I wish I could ping all the things. And I wish my iPhone could ping my Watch in return.


Rene

I almost never use glances. I use the Settings/Control Center glance the most. I get the idea of glances. In many ways they're the opposite of notifications. Instead of providing data as it happens, they provide data when you want it. My patterns just favor notification style data presentation more.

Perhaps if Apple allows for more dynamic glances, like the Settings/Control Center glance but for other apps, I'll find them more compelling in the future.

How about apps?


Serenity

Unless the app is natively run on the watch, it's already an immediate loss. Apps I thought I'd use constantly, like Authy, take so long to load that I've already grabbed my phone and unlocked it out of frustration. If watchOS can dramatically speed up app launching, that would help a lot; there's also the matter of the Carousel home screen. It's cluttered, hard to tap, and just uncomfortable to use. For this version of watchOS, Apple needs to consider a home screen reinvention — preferably one with larger tap targets.

There's also a separate question about how the company should pitch third-party developers about building apps — it's been a year, and I have very few apps I actually launch with any regularity. (Wallet, Workout, Stopwatch, Pedometer++, Yelp, Fantastical, Carrot Weather, and Just Press Record.) These work because they're simple, direct, and easy to follow.


Bader

I don't think I'm alone here in wanting Apple to fundamentally rethink the way apps work on the Watch. More than that, Apple lost my faith in their potential when native apps on watchOS 2.0 failed to improve the overall experience.

Most Apple Watch apps shouldn't exist, or should be pared down to one or two core features. With watchOS 3.0, I have no doubt we'll hear all about how the company plans to make apps useful for existing Watch users, but most of the actual payoff will be seen with the second-generation Apple Watch, which is still a few months away.


Lory

I've always been excited about the potential that third-party developers have to create Apple Watch content. So far, unfortunately, the results have been mostly lackluster. Apps could provide more than just notifications. They could act as an extension of the main iPhone app. Some developers have successfully integrated Apple Watch usefulness - Kitchen Stories sends a shopping list to your wrist, Calcbot turns your watch into a calculator - but many of the apps I use the most on the iPhone don't provide enough features on the Apple Watch. I don't think Apple is to blame for why developers haven't spent more time making content that is useful for Apple Watch.


Mikah

Native apps were supposed to vastly improve the speed and reliability of apps on Apple Watch. They didn't live up to their promise. I avoid using Apple Watch apps as much as possible, because I can't be bothered to wait for them. Pulling my phone out of my pocket/bag/the bottom of Lake Baikal is always faster than waiting for Apple Watch apps to load.

While I'm hopeful changes to the operating system can make the experience better, I'm also not getting my hopes up. I think we're going to need some hardware improvements before apps on the Watch can surprise and delight. And maybe, just maybe, that'll be the thing that gets developers truly excited about creating unique, awesome, useful Apple Watch apps.

In summary: better, faster, stronger.


Gartenberg

apps have been one of the disappointments for me. At the moment it's way too hard to organize the app screen, it's like playing an annoying game. Apps themselves are often way too slow to the point of not being worth the effort. There are some nice examples that do work well for me, such as Clear but until we get to fully native apps I'm going to keep my use limited.


Georgia

I would love to be able to view multiple months in the Calendar app. I often need to check a date or look ahead and get frustrated that I need to use my iPhone.


Rene

There's a possibility that future Watch hardware will make apps lightning fast to launch, refresh, and otherwise perform. Otherwise, future watchOS software can only optimize as best it can.

I do use some apps, like Authy, often. I don't use a lot. I'm not sure what apps mean on Watch yet, and I don't think anybody does. The assumption that they would be like iPhone apps may turn out to be false, though.

It could be that apps in watchOS don't just need an improvement, but a re-imagining.

What do you want to see when it comes to health and fitness features?


Serenity

More types of exercise in the Workout app, please! I realize it's difficult to track any wrist-bending exercise (including weight lifting, yoga, gymnastics, dancing, and, say, roller derby) due to the way the oximeter reads your pulse, but until the company includes better sensors in the second version of watchOS, there must be a good in-between. All my workouts are Other logs, and they just look silly at this point.

And leaderboards, please. Competing against friends would be delightful.


Bader

As competent as the Watch's hardware-based fitness features are, the software is almost comically simple. Compared to even the most inexpensive of fitness trackers from Fitbit or Jawbone, or popular iOS apps like Runkeeper, the Apple Watch's offering just doesn't keep up.

As others have said, leaderboards and achievements are table stakes these days, but it's unclear, based on the tepid development of Game Center, whether Apple would maintain the Watch's social elements indefinitely. I'd love it is Apple opened up its fitness API so I could take advantage of the speed and reliability of the native fitness apps, but export that data into Strava, Runkeeper or even Fitbit. A man can dream.


Lory

I'm ashamed to admit that I just don't pay much attention to the Activity app for Apple Watch. While it is nice to see the information when I want it, I don't really care that much about my move calories, exercise progress, or personal achievements. I'd like new activity notifications that I can customize. I like seeing how many steps I've walked and I want reminders to stand once per hour. I'd also like to be able to see my sleep data in the Activity app.

The Workout app on Apple Watch is kind of a joke. You can either use one of the nine limited workout routines or create one manually using the "Other" routine. Apple needs to put some effort into the Workout app or just get rid of it altogether and let third-party developers have access to the Activity app so their data can be connected.


Mikah

I quite like the current state of Apple Watch health and fitness. I'm able to keep track of many different data points, and I'm still delighted each day by the knowledge that I'm building a database of my activity and the health of my heart. It's a fun reminder that I'm living in the future and the future is friggin' awesome.

Like my fellow iS'Mores, I wouldn't mind taking the gamification of fitness to the next level with leaderboards. I'm already motivated by the need to fill my fitness rings; I can't imagine the motivation I'd get from trying to climb the leaderboard!


Gartenberg

workout is a great concept. I personally like the simplicity of how things work. Given the current limits on this generation's sensors I don't think that there's a lot that can be added in terms of sports tracking. I have found 3rd party apps to be somewhat more accurate for step counting so would like to see Apple at least deliver that level of performance and accuracy.


Georgia

Increased accuracy without having to carry my iPhone with me. Many people still use other health tracking devices for this reason. Fitness tracking is exceptionally important to those who train and those wanting to know exactly how hard they worked out.

I would love to also use the side button with the stop watch. That way, when I am timing my children, I wouldn't have to look at the watch to ensure that I have stopped the time, allowing me to keep my eyes on the action.


Rene

Leaderboads. And challenges. Has anyone asked for those yet? I love the personal metrics Watch gives me, but I'd love it much more if I could see those metrics head-to-head against Serenity's, Lory's, Bader's, Mikah's, etc. That's hugely motivational for me.

If I just get an alert, I might not get up. If I see Georgia or Gartenberg are beating me, I'm getting up!

And communications? Does Digital Touch have a future?


Serenity

It saddens me, but probably not. I loved the concept, but in reality, I just don't use it.


Bader

Like Live Photos, I love the idea of Digital Touch, but its siloed nature makes it difficult to appreciate. The screen is too small, and my fingers too stubby, to create any truly memorable sketches, but more than that it just doesn't fit into most peoples' social networking hierarchies.

My three year-old cousin LOVES Digital Touch, though. Whenever she sees me, the first thing she asks is if she can draw pictures on my arm. I think there's something to that, but I'm not entirely sure what it can turn into to find success.


Lory

Unfortunately, no. I think Digital Touch is a fun feature, but it really is just a novelty that should be relegated to an app instead of one of Apple Watch's main features. The only way to access Digital Touch is via the Friends hub on the Side button. Instead, Apple could make Digital Touch an app on the Home screen and redesign the Side button to be customizable. That way, people could still use the personal sketch (my mom and I use it fairly regularly), but it wouldn't be such a useless focal point of the device.


Mikah

What even is Digital Touch? In all seriousness, I don't use it at all. The last Apple Watch communication I received was a sketch of BB-8 from Rene, but that's only because we'd just exchanged contact information.


Gartenberg

I totally forgot it existed until we started this chat. It's just something I never use, it's way too limited and after showing it off once or twice I doubt many consumers are using the feature.


Georgia

I don't know anyone who still uses Digital Touch. It was a cute idea, but it needs to evolve into, or give way to, something that's more compelling.


Rene

I'm an artist, so I've always liked Sketches, but the sad truth is no one sends them to me any more. Even if I send them to someone else, I seldom get them back and never more than once or twice.

The entire Friends hub may need a rethink. Communication is incredibly important. Digital Touch was a worthy experiment. Maybe even an important one. But its usage doesn't seem to match its prominence.

A single push of the side button goes to friends, which means it should be an incredibly important place. Perhaps redesigning it as a messaging hub would help. Perhaps letting that single push be assignable, so health and fitness tasks or something else could take its place would work better.

Either way, based on recent marketing, I think this is high on Apple's list of things to do as well.

How about Wallet and Apple Pay?


Serenity

One of my favorite uses of the Apple Watch, though the messaging behind how you use the watch needs to improve. I end up just sort of rubbing the display over the terminal until I hear the chime, but that's likely bad for both my watch's screen and the machine.


Bader

I have never not found paying with my Apple Watch to be anything less than an awkward experience. I love the implementation of boarding passes and other loyalty cards, but still take out my iPhone when I actually want to use Apple Pay. I don't see that changing anytime soon.


Lory

I've noted in previous Roundtable discussions that I've actually only used Apple Pay on Apple Watch a couple of times, and they were always in an Apple retail store. The feature isn't supported at most of the businesses that I patronize yet, and when I do come across it, I'm so unfamiliar with the process that I usually just shy away from the whole thing and pull out my credit or debit card instead.


Mikah

There aren't enough stores around me that support Apple Pay, but I have my cards loaded up just in case. I love the idea of Apple Pay, and (on the rare occasion I'm presented with the option) jump at the chance to use it.

Paying for stuff with a device attached to my wrist? The future is awesome!


Gartenberg

I'm a big fan of ApplePay on watch. the double click feature isn't very intuitable, and could be fixed. I find myself creating a lot of unwanted screenshots by accident.


Georgia

My bank launches today, I'll let you know!


Rene

So far, so great. Thanks to notification center and the double push on the side button, everything from boarding passes to Starbucks to credit cards is incredibly easy to access and use. So easy, I use it all the time.

It's so great, and so useful, I'm hoping Apple announces peer-to-peer payments at some point as well.

Any big Siri or HomeKit changes on your list?


Serenity

More reliability, please. Siri is fast and smart on the Apple Watch… sometimes. When it's not, I find it hard to rely on Siri for anything, which means I stop using its most useful features (setting timers, sending messages to friends, opening apps with my voice, and the like).

"Hey Siri" on the watch is also tricky, because there's just a limited window after the screen coming on during a wrist raise when you can call out the phrase. I'm not sure if battery life on the current models allows the watch to be listening more often or longer, but it would be much appreciated.

HomeKit has a similar problem: I've all but abandoned using iOS devices for my connected home, instead routing everything through Amazon's Echo (which talks to all my HomeKit switches, bulbs, and other devices, anyway). Reliability would go a long way to making HomeKit trustworthy.


Bader

I love using Siri on the Apple Watch, and can't wait for the system to get even more intelligent with iOS 10 and watchOS 3.0. Speed and reliability could be better, but I get tons of mileage out of it in its current form.

As for HomeKit, I don't own anything compatible with the platform, but I hear, "Hey Siri, start the music" is the new shorthand for "Dance party at Rene's place!"


Lory

Siri needs a solid polishing. It runs so slow on Apple Watch that it isn't even useful. It can't do as much as the iPhone version can. Many times, I'll ask for Siri's help with something on Apple Watch and be told I have to continue the task on my iPhone. Hopefully, watch OS 3.0 will see huge improvements in the virtual assistant, because at the moment, it's practically useless.

As for HomeKit, I'm afraid I don't know very much about how it works with Apple Watch. I only have one smart bulb in my house, and it isn't supported on Apple Watch just yet.


Mikah

Better, faster, stronger. I want Siri on my Apple Watch to be as responsive as Siri on my iPhone, and I don't feel like that's asking for too much. The day that Siri on Apple Watch can start a 30-second timer in less than 30-seconds (I'm exaggerating) is the day I start to fall in love with Siri again.

As I mentioned before, I'd love to have HomeKit complications. It'd be nifty to have a complication I can tap to fool with my Hue lights or toggle a Belkin WeMo switch.


Gartenberg

Siri just doesn't cut it on watch. It's far too hit or miss if Siri will respond to "hey Siri" at all. HomeKit devices also seem to require a much more limited syntax than Echo does so almost all home automation is routed through Echo. I suspect the fix here is going to be new hardware.


Georgia

I'd love to be able to use Siri on my Apple Watch to control my Apple TV.


Rene

I'm not sure a software update can make Siri better on Apple Watch. That might need new hardware.

I still use it for everything from making calls to controlling the Hue lights in my home, and it works… albeit slowly.

Now I just want to be able to control my Apple TV with it.

Anything else? Maps? Remote controls? Calendars?


Serenity

Maps' directions wrist-tapping is so cool, but I want those notifications outside the default app. Let Google Maps hook into those notifications, and I would use them constantly. (Sorry, Maps. You're just not very good in New England, and I've gotten lost way too often when using you.)

And this is sort of hardware, sort of software, but: Apple, let us customize the Side button. Please and thank you.


Bader

There are still so many ways the Apple Watch falls short in my everyday life, but they're not tied specifically to the Watch, but to Apple's ecosystem as a whole. I'd love to be able to lift my wrist and tell Siri to start a Spotify playlist, reply to Rene in Slack, and get me an Uber to the airport, but that's not the Watch's fault. I'd love Digital Touch to hook into Snapchat, but again, that's not the Watch's fault.

But I also have to remind myself that this is the first generation of a brand new category for Apple, and I've never enjoyed using, or derived as much utility, from any first-gen Apple product before. That's a huge achievement.


Lory

Apple's apps on watchOS suffer the same problems that third-party apps do, they load slow (and sometimes not at all). The Maps app is very useful because you can actually search for new locations to get directions, and even check out nearby businesses. But, it takes nearly 10 seconds to load the app, and when you search for an address, it takes another 10 seconds for it to load on the watch.

I do like using the Remote app on Apple Watch. It's great for navigating through Apple TV when I'm too far away and too lazy to get up and grab the Siri Remote. It works good, but could use a couple of additional features - a Home button, for example.


Mikah

Y'know, I hesitate to encourage Apple to do too much too fast. I think any improvements that result in more battery life, better performance, and more reliability are more important than improving Maps or making changes to Remote.

Frankly, the Remote app is pretty sweet as is. It's oddly reliable and kind of a joy to use (future!). I guess if I was going to ask for anything else, it'd be true (not-hacky) sleep tracking. So I guess what I really want is more battery life, 'cause that's the only way I'm going to be able to wear my Apple Watch to bed and have it track my sleep without me having to think too much.


Gartenberg

maps is great for street walking, I can't see using it for anything else though. Remote is my last resort when I can't find my Apple TV Remote or the phone is too far away. I'm pretty pleased with calendar, I don't personally need to see more but I suspect others might. Finally, let me customize that side button to features I'd like to use. That space is too precious to waste on a limited hard coded function.


Georgia

I'm still having trouble telling the difference between the left and right taps on the Apple watch Maps navigation. I would love an even greater definition between the two. Perhaps one more of a buzz and the other a tap for example. I have tried practicing but I often have to look to make sure I don't turn the wrong way.


Rene

I still want Calendar to get more views. Not being able to swipe through months means not being able to use it as, you know, a calendar.

I'd love to see proper Reminders and Notes integration, so I look up what I want to do and what I need to remember right on my Watch.

Podcasts would also be sweet.

Bottom line, what's your biggest wish for watchOS 3?


Serenity

Polish and table-setting. We've had a year to test out the Apple Watch and really figure out its strengths and weaknesses; now is the time for Apple to use all that data and build a must-use Apple Watch operating system.


Bader

Work it, Make it, Do it, Makes us, Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger.


Lory

What I want, more than anything, from watchOS 3.0 is an improvement to launching and loading apps. If content loaded faster on Apple Watch, I'd be much more likely to use it. Right now, I may try to launch something on Apple Watch, but I'll end up frustrated at how long it is taking and then switch over to my iPhone anyway.


Mikah

Excuse me while I find Daniel Bader, take off my white glove, and hit him with it. As you can probably tell by my responses throughout, I've been building up to that exact line. sigh I, too, want a better, faster, stronger watchOS 3.


Gartenberg

speed, speed, and speed. I'm hoping there's some optimization left. Last thing I'd want to see is a new OS that doesn't work well on current hardware. I've been down that path with iOS before, and I don't want to see that here.


Georgia

Apple Watch needs to be a better watch, and that means ambient time. Even if it costs me some battery life, being able to casually and discreetly glance at the time without having to turn my wrist or tap the screen is incredibly important in my line of work.


Rene

watchOS 2 was really a completion of watchOS 1. It took partial implementations and made them full. watchOS 3 could continue that. Less useful features could be deprecated and more useful ones could be introduced.

Wrist computing is new and wonderful and exciting and forward thinking, but for me the killer feature is still convenience.
Performance will come with better hardware. For the software, being able to handle those brief, frequent, important interactions quickly and elegantly is where it's at.

Give me more of that, and I'll be really happy with watchOS 3.