ebooks case

Apple settles ebook price-fixing trial outside the courts

Apple has come to an agreement outside the courts to close an antitrust lawsuit, which alleges the company conspired with publishers to inflate ebook pricing for iPhone and iPad owners. The lawsuit was brought forward by 33 US states and by avoiding the upcoming trial on July 14, Apple has avoided a potential payout of $840 million in damages.

More →

7
loading...
12
loading...
36
loading...
0
loading...

With iBooks tied up by courts, Amazon runs roughshod over publishers

When the U.S. government sued Apple over its entry into the ebooks market there was a fear that the action would result in Amazon, who already enjoyed a dominant market position, increasing their power to potentially abusive levels. So, was that fear justified?

More →

16
loading...
24
loading...
43
loading...
0
loading...

Apple brings out the big guns in ebooks case — economists!

Despite a series of events that would be better suited for a David E. Kelly legal comedy than an actual court of law, Apple is still fighting on in their ebook case, and this time bringing in some economists as backup, namely Bradford Cornell of CalTech and Janusz Ordover of NYU. The goal seems to be to better explain to the court why, according to Apple, they don't understand the market and are getting it all wrong.

More →

6
loading...
16
loading...
38
loading...
0
loading...

Apple formally appeals ebook antitrust ruling - does it stand a chance?

Apple on Tuesday filed paperwork with the New York federal court to appeal a 2013 ruling that found the company in violation of antitrust laws regarding its iBooks publishing arrangements with major book publishers.

More →

7
loading...
0
loading...
36
loading...
0
loading...

Apple really doesn't like their antitrust monitor; attempts to put his work on hold

Apple is once again asking a federal appeals court to grant a stay on the work of court-appointed antitrust monitor, Michael Bromwich. While a temporary reprieve was granted two weeks ago, Apple hopes that the court will put Bromwich's work on hold until its decided whether or not he should have been placed at Apple to begin with

More →

6
loading...
12
loading...
41
loading...
0
loading...

Apple gets temporary reprieve from external antitrust monitor; should it be a permanent one?

Apple has been temporarily spared the presence of an external antitrust monitor, initially placed at the company as part of the judgment in the U.S. government's case against Apple regarding ebooks. Apple has been fighting to remove the monitor, Michael Bromwich, since he was placed at the company last summer. The company believes that Bromwich is a disruptive and unnecessary imposition, according to Reuters:

More →

6
loading...
11
loading...
43
loading...
0
loading...

How anti-Apple, pro-Amazon manipulations have resulted in less competition, higher ebook prices

Sometimes when there's smoke, there's just smoke. And sometimes there are Kindles full of fire. Following the Wall Street Journal's scathing opinion piece last month, another media outlet is now asking questions about the conduct of the Department of Justice, the judge, and the external monitor. Kathleen Sharp goes so far as to call Amazon's crusade "bogus" in her headline on Slate:

More →

11
loading...
25
loading...
82
loading...
0
loading...

Apple ebook bench called out as 'offensive to the rule of law and a disgrace to the judiciary'

The Wall Street Journal began the year making me wonder if they'd thrown journalistic integrity out the window in an effort to ride the Apple is Doomed train into clickbait history, and now they're ending it with about as pro an Apple editorial as possible. In the piece, which appears without byline, the WSJ calls Judge Denise Cote "abusive" and the special prosecutor a "friend" who is "besieging" Apple in an arrangement that's "flatly unconstitutional". And that's not the worst of it:

More →

3
loading...
9
loading...
37
loading...
0
loading...

Apple says overseer out of order, judge out of order, entire ebooks case out of order!

U.S. District Judge Denise Cote smacked Apple down in the federal ebook anti-trust investigation like they'd insulted her mother, she appointed former inspector general Michael Bromwich to watch them like a hawk, lest they dare offend again. Now, however, it's Apple who's claiming offense, and suggesting the court has crossed the line from judge to prosecutor. Philip Elmer-DeWitt writing for Fortune:

More →

4
loading...
5
loading...
35
loading...
0
loading...

Apple given permanent injunction in ebook case, external antitrust monitor to be installed

Judge Denise Cote has imposed an injunction on Apple in the ebook price-fixing case, which, among other things, will install an external antitrust monitor for the company. Apple will also be required to end all agreements with the five major publishers that prevent Apple from lowering ebook prices. Reuters:

More →

3
loading...
1
loading...
27
loading...
0
loading...

Pages