Apple's iPhone and iPad operating system hits the big one-zero this year, but there's still lots left that iMore's editors hope to see!

iPhone OS launched nine years ago this June; in that time, we've gone from iPhone to iPad, no third-party apps to the App Store, and from something brand new to something running on a billion devices around the world. Yet on the eve of WWDC 2016, there remain many features we'd love to see iOS 10 branch out and conquer.

Let's start with the setup assistant. It's gotten… rather long and involved. What could Apple do to make setting up a new iPhone or iPad easier and quicker?


Serenity

Much as I loathe the current setup assistant, I'm not sure what Apple could do to simplify matters without taking away initial device functionality. It's a pain for me, but I set up an iOS device as new almost every month; the average user may only see the assistant once a year, if that, and it may not be nearly as arduous a process for them.

I do think that Apple should make the process of restoring from backup a little swifter: Most backup-related material could hypothetically be done over the air (like restoring apps) after the system is in place, but iCloud backups still often take 45 minutes to two hours to restore properly. It'd be nice to see a faster method for getting the end-user a working device more quickly after restoring from backup.


Bader

I'm going to start off a little ranty: I really, thoroughly dislike the new iPhone setup routine. It's long, yes, but it's increasingly disjointed and confusing. Worse is when you need to restore from a previous device; setting up the device as new forces you to reinstall and reconfigure all of your apps manually, while restoring from iCloud (which is the more common scenario over a local Mac backup) is an all-or-nothing affair. The problem is that there is usually a considerable amount of cruft in my iCloud backups. I like Android's solution here: selective restoration of apps and settings. If that were possible, I'd probably spend less time downloading and logging into the 30 or so essential apps I use every day.

On the iPad, the setup procedure has not been optimized for the larger screen real estate, which is very unlike Apple, and gives an unfavorable first impression. So let's change that, too, while we're at it.


Lory

It's been a long time since I've set up an iPhone from new. I usually restore one from a recent backup. But, even when I'm syncing content from a backup, the setup process does take a long time. For a brand new iPhone or iPad owner, this could probably seem daunting. It might be helpful if Apple implemented a way to enable the setup features only when you are about to need to use them. For example, Apple could postpone requesting you to decide on Location Services until you actually open the Maps app or another app that requires the feature.


Mikah

Hold up, is it actually called setup buddy? You learn something new …

I do get tired of going through the setup process over and over and over and over again, but I think I prefer it to the alternative: not having nuanced control over the basic settings for my device. I mean, most settings have a Skip button — if you don't feel like setting something up, just skip over it. I guess if there's anything I'd like to see changed, it's that iOS would get a little smarter about knowing whether I'm setting up a brand new device or just updating the operating system on a device I'm currently using. Rene's Manual vs. Automatic paths are essentially what I'm looking for.


Gartenberg

It's actually gotten better over time. Remember the first iPhone. I talked to a few new users, they had no issues with the current setup. Longer time users might have some complaints but hard to do much better


Rene

I'd split Setup Buddy into two paths at this point: manual and automatic. Manual would let you individually toggle and set up each and every feature. Automatic would have you log into iCloud, setup Touch ID, Siri, and Apple Pay, and set everything else to default. Then, at the end, give the option to review settings, and the ability to go back through it at any time.

Siri is on everyone's short list. How can Apple's digital assistant capture more natural language hearts and minds?


Serenity

Siri needs reliability, speed, and smarts to truly vault over the rest of the voice assistant pack. And some sort of access to third-party apps.


Bader

We've spoken about this at length, but Siri needs to graduate from virtual high school. The assistant is pretty capable already, but I want Siri to be able to plug into third-party apps so, in addition to starting a playlist from Apple Music, I can do so from Spotify or TIDAL, or (god forbid) Google Play Music.

And let me input text to chat with Siri instead of relying almost entirely on voice. Spotlight search is already pretty good, but let's take that one step further.


Lory

Siri needs to be better at learning how we talk. If I use a lot of "ums" and "ers," it should learn my style and adjust accordingly. It should take into account regional accents and people who speak using a secondary language. It also needs to get better at understanding vagaries. I'd really be happy if the first time I asked Siri to do something, it got it right.


Mikah

Wait, didn't we talk about this recently? ;)

I want Siri to take a few pages out of the Amazon Alexa playbook. I want to trust my virtual assistant again; right now I opt out of using Siri as often as possible, because it disappoints me more often than it does what I ask it to do. If Apple could improve Siri's success rate, open it up to third parties, and improve upon its existing capabilities, I'll be a happy camper. But that's a lot to ask, so we'll see!


Gartenberg

Siri needs to become HAL 9000 but without the locking me out of myself and trying to kill me. For the foreseeable future? It's all more smoke and mirrors, AI is a long way off. I hope


Rene

Voice ID has stopped accidental and malicious activations, but intentional ones still aren't reliable enough. I'd also like to have alternate activation phrases and the ability to type rather than talk to Siri. And yes, Siri Voice Free.

An API would be great, since the more services the better the overall service, but it would need to handle competing and colliding apps and services gracefully, and work internationally. No small feat.

I'd also love more of "this". "Remind me about this" is great. "Share this", and letting me send anything to iMessage, Mail, Twitter, Facebook, etc., "Read this" and having any text converted to speech, "Protect this" and having it lock down, and so on would be phenomenally convenient.

What about the venerable Home screen? Can Apple let Siri and Spotlight slowly take over, or does it need a re-thinking? iPad-specific?


Serenity

I've spoken at length about my iPad home screen desires, so I won't expound on those too much more here. Needless to say, we're about to hit iOS 10 — not only is 10 a significant milestone, but it's a pretty good excuse for taking another look at the Home screen and the purpose it serves. Personally, I would love to see some widget/Notification Center integration straight on the screen, rather than endless rows of apps and folders.


Bader

I rarely use the homescreen to launch apps anymore. I either swipe down to launch from Spotlight, or already have it open and 3D Touch on the left side of my iPhone 6s Plus to quickly open the multitasking menu. The problem right now, though, is that many apps added Spotlight Search capabilities with iOS 9, but there is no way to prioritize those listings. I often want to jump into Transit app to check when the next 505 streetcar is coming (the name of the line), but typing that into Spotlight brings up a number of results before it figures out that I am talking about Transit App.

On the iPad, I want better density on the home screen, and improved keyboard shortcuts for getting around.


Lory

I love the idea of the Home screen being something more like a dashboard where you keep widgets similar to how the Today view in Notification Center works. I use spotlight more often than not when looking for an app I want to open, so there really is no need to keep apps on the Home screen at all. I would be much happier if I could use a widget that showed me the current temperature or upcoming calendar events instead.


Mikah

This is going to upset a few people, but I'd love to see an Androidy Home screen. I like widgets, I like nuanced control over the placement of my apps, and I like hiding or showing apps at my discretion. Forgive me for the blasphemy, but I think Android is superior when it comes to the Home screen paradigm.

As it stands, I mostly use Spotlight search to find and launch apps I use less frequently. My most used apps exist on their own on my Home screen; the rest are stashed in folders labeled with single letters (I don't have the time or the desire to organize them).


Gartenberg

a screen of icons worked… for the first iPhone. Even folders don't work. It's time to think beyond grids of apps and folders of apps


Rene

As much as some people turn their noses up at the Home page, the static grid of icons is what's made iOS accessible to the widest group of people in the history of computing. The "minus one" Home screen has recommended apps, that offer a dynamic alternative, and Spotlight and Siri allow for targeted launch on demand. 3D Touch even lets you launch straight into actions inside apps.

That said, I think I'd prefer recommended and favorite apps in Notification Center, so they're available everywhere and at any time. Rich notifications would be great as well. With extensibility, features can be pulled from apps and shown anywhere. Why not in notifications?

For iPad, I'd still love it if Apple gave it a distinct, tablet-optimized Home screen, the way the company has Watch and TV. I know Apple sees Home screen as a portal and not a destination, and I have a hard time imagining what would be valuable enough that sacrificing consistency with iPhone would be worth it, but it feels like there could be something there. And not just multiple picture-in-picture apps.

Speaking of which, better and more consistent ways of switching apps in Split View would be so nice. Left/primary one way and right/secondary another way just adds to cognitive load. Also, make it view based rather than app based, so multiple instances of the same app are possible, and add the ability to drag and drop data and objects between compatible views, and the sky's the limit.

I'd also love to be able to lock any app or data item with Touch ID or a password. That way, if I ever need to hand someone my iPhone or iPad, my messages, photos, documents, and other content could still be safe.

Control Center is easier — the evolution from static to dynamic content will make it more valuable all on its own.

Oh, and complications for the Lock screen please. Being able to see activity, weather, scores, calendar and reminders, and other small snippets of data and information would be fantastic.

Messaging is hot, hot, hot. Does iMessage need to evolve in a Google and Facebook bot world?


Serenity

Please! iMessage is one of my most-used chatting platforms, but I find myself missing bits from Slack, Facebook Messenger, and GroupMe, including support for inline links and gif searches. And what about emoji reactions? Third-party keyboards make this partially functional, but I'd much prefer a built-in iMessage toolbar for such things.

Also, I mentioned this in our OS X roundtable, but I would love for iMessage to treat group messages properly, and combine messages from the same person (but at different numbers) so they aren't all in separate threads.


Bader

I like iMessage, but I do want peer-to-peer money transfer support, in-line link expansion, and improved deactivation handoffs. This is a pretty specific problem, but as someone who regularly turns off iMessage while testing Android devices for Android Central, I often leave my friends in iMessage purgatory, where messaging me in an existing thread results in an error instead of automatically sending it as an SMS. I don't know what Apple can do to fix this, but perhaps even a prompt to create a new non-iMessage SMS thread would go a long way.


Lory

I don't think iMessage needs any kind of updates or changes. I am very happy with the features that Apple's native chat app comes with. You can send videos, audio clips, or text. You can use third-party keyboards to grab GIFs and stickers. I think bots have the potential to greatly improve convenience in our daily lives, but I don't think iMessage needs to participate in it. You have a choice when deciding to use a third-party chat app like Slack, Hangouts, or Messenger, but every cell phone uses some sort of texting feature and I wouldn't want to worry about what types of data my iPhone's text service was collecting in order to provide me with convenience.


Mikah

I don't need bots in my iMessage app, but man-oh-man do I want iMessage to be more like Slack! Heck, I've all but memorized all the Slack emoji shortcuts. It'd be so awesome to react to messages with emoji like I can in Slack. Doubling down, it'd also be nice to see link expansion in iMessage.

Daniel mentioned peer-to-peer money transfer; I don't know why Apple hasn't done this already. The latest hotness is totes sending money to your friends with an app or some other service. If Apple wants to supercharge Apple Pay adoption, peer-to-peer money transfer is a fantastic way to do so.


Gartenberg

I love messaging. It works. Please don't try to fix it.


Rene

I'd like confirmation dialogs so I can't accidentally send anyone a selfie or my location. The ability to favorite messages would also be helpful, as would moving VIP from a mail-only feature to a Contact-level feature so I can be notified for some but not all messages.

I'm not sure if "bots" of the future of messaging, but the ability to @siri, @notes, @calendar, etc. and immediately shoot text commands, queries, and strings without having to change contexts would be sweet.

Sending money would also be great, though would require far broader support, including peer-to-peer tap-to-Apple pay and a way to get money out of the system.

Camera and Photos, what needs to happen there?


Bader

I would like a native Professional Mode in the Camera app, or the option of defaulting to a third-party camera app from the lock screen. One or the other, Apple.

I'm thrilled with the Photos app, though. iCloud Photo Library works perfectly, and syncs quickly with its Mac counterpart.


Serenity

I'm with Bader: More manual features in the default Camera app, please. I love shooting with apps like Obscura, but the convenience factor is much lower; and when it comes down to it, I'm more likely to launch the Camera app from its shortcut than manually finding an app from the home screen.

On the Photos side, GIF support. Please. The lack of GIF display (and iCloud Photo Library archive support) is painful.


Lory

I've never been particularly impressed with the interface of the built-in Camera app. Zoom, for example, is painfully behind the times. You still have to use two-finger pinch to zoom in and out. How about a single-finger drag? I can't stand that all of the options and tools are right on the camera viewfinder screen when taking photos. I'd like to be able to hide them, so I can use the entire iPhone screen, unobscured.

The Photos app is pretty decent on iOS, especially on the iPhone. Content is organized chronologically in your personal collection, plus you can access content from various albums, including smart albums that automatically separate certain pictures based on available data, like Selfies, Panoramas, Snapchats, and more. The iCloud Photo Sharing feed is a little clunky. I'm not a fan of the Activity folder. It could use an updated interface design.


Mikah

Give me more power over my camera if I want it. I know there are loads of nifty third-party apps that offer up all the control in the world, but there's some sort of psychological block for me: I don't quite feel right taking control of the camera outside of the camera app. I know, weird.

As for Photos, leave it be! It's fast, it's friendly, and it's nice to look at. I guess if there's anything I'd like to see added here, it's more discovery features. I enjoy it when apps like Google Photos or Timehop send me a notification telling me to "remember X day." Apple should borrow this feature for Photos.


Gartenberg

The brilliance of camera is I don't need to futz with settings. If I want to do that, I'd use a Leica. I want camera to be simple and make all the hard decisions for me. I would like more control over cached files that Google Photos gives me


Rene

You can search for Faces in Photos, but only if you've set them up on the Mac. I'd love that to become native to iOS as well. Anything to make finding photos and videos faster.

I'd like a normalization of what starring means on iOS as well. In some apps it's bookmarking, in others biasing. What I'd really like is for anything I star to automatically go into an easy-to-find folder, and be cached locally and never purged.

Also, Live Photos folder please.

Okay, we've braced ourselves… Apple Music, go!


Serenity

Haven't I complained enough about Apple Music for one lifetime? No? Okay. My biggest picks for iOS 10 are an interface declutter, custom offline support for tracks, and making For You even better.


Bader

I'm with Lory: do a better job separating offline content from online, and break out iCloud Music Library content from Apple Music. And give me lyrics support.


Lory

I know that some people have been through a lot of pain and suffering in terms of Apple Music, but I've been fairly satisfied with the service, overall. I'd like Apple to get rid of Connect altogether because it seems like a waste of effort for all parties involved.

The user interface on iOS is a little awkward. It isn't easy to figure out how to access content by artist, album, or song unless you are familiar with the interface. If you turn on the "Only Downloaded Music" feature, you might accidentally confuse yourself when you can't find playlists you created, but haven't downloaded for offline listening. But the mechanics of the app work for me. I haven't spent the past 10 years crafting the perfect digital music library, though. So, I'm easier to please.


Mikah

Meh. Meh, meh, meh. Meh.

"Make it better" isn't a helpful request, so I'll say this: Restore my faith in Apple Music by making sure it does a better job letting me know what music is mine and what music isn't mine and helping me understand why sometimes I'll open up the app and all the music I downloaded for offline listening is suddenly not available locally anymore.

Oh, and I agree with my colleagues: HELLO, WHY DON'T I ALREADY HAVE LYRICS IN THE MUSIC APP‽


Gartenberg

ack. I don't like music anymore. The app that is. Too much pushing me to subscribe, a lousy UI. This needs a lot of thought, think first iPhone


Rene

Apple Music has an impossible job. Unlike most Apple apps, it lacks opinion and so tries to cater to too many disparate use cases for it to do any of them well.

I only ever use Music via Siri: "Play Mistachuck" and Mistachuck I get. Others want all nine versions of the same Ozzy song they've ripped and carefully tagged over the years. Let iTunes Match serve the old case, Apple Music the new, label both cleanly, and don't let them mess with each other's data.

For me, Continuity for media would be the biggest improvement Apple could do. That way I could start watching on my iPhone, handoff to Apple TV when I get into the living room, then handoff again to iPad when I want to retire for the evening, and never have to stop watching.

Any other Apple apps you'd like to see changed? Maps, Mail, Calendar, News?


Serenity

It'll never happen, but: Let me set my default routing app in Settings. I'd love to use Maps, since the app is actually quite good, but the data is just terrible in New England where I drive. On more than one occasion, I've been taken down strange side streets or unpaved roads; it's just not worth the hassle. The company could also improve its traffic data; Google is outright smoking Maps thanks to its Waze integration. (Google's new "multiple stops" and "search while on a current route" features are also must-haves for Maps.)


Bader

Let me hide or delete apps I don't use, like Maps, Mail, Calendar and News. I use third-party equivalents of all of these, and resent the increasingly-full "Rotten Apple" folder on my home screen.

As for the apps themselves, Maps needs better traffic data (for Toronto, at least) before it will replace Google Maps or Waze. Outlook or GTFO; I haven't used native Mail since Google turned off Exchange support for Gmail, because IMAP. Calendar? Fantastical 4 Lyfe. News? Bring it to Canada and we'll talk.

Sorry, I know that's not useful, but I can't talk about apps I don't use.


Lory

I don't use very many of Apple's built-in apps because there are so many third-party apps with better design aesthetic. I don't like the way the gestures work in the Mail app, or that you can't swipe to delete a message.

The calendar app is too plain. On iPhone, there is no weekly view in portrait mode and the combination monthly view with to-do list seems too packed. I'd also really like to be able to connect third-party apps like Trello or TripIt.

I was so disappointed with the Maps app when it first launched that I've never been able to get back into using it, even though I know Apple has made major improvements since it launched. However, it still lacks some important features that are essential for me. Until very recently, the Maps app didn't even have transportation data in my city, which is California's state capital. It's not like I live in a small, rural town or anything. The nearby business search feature could use some work.

What I'd really like, is to be able to hide built-in apps that I don't use. Sure, I can stick them in a folder and ignore them, but there should be an option to toggle them off on the Home screen if you don't use them. They could still be accessible from Spotlight search.


Mikah

Spoken like a bunch of power-users, I get the feeling most of us don't use many of Apple's built-in apps. As for me: * Maps: I use Google Maps. I used to use Apple Maps, but I started using Google Maps again four or so months ago and I've not looked back since. I find the voice direction and detailed turn-by-turn directions, coupled with the accuracy and always-up-to-date maps available on Google Maps to outweigh the benefit of Apple Maps OS-level integration. Bring all those things to Apple Maps and I'll switch back! * Mail: I use Airmail. Airmail syncs everything and then some across all my devices, it offers snooze support, it handles Gmail accounts better, it's feature-rich, and it gets me to Inbox Zero faster than any other mail app I've ever used. If iOS Mail brings in snooze support and syncing across devices (both iOS and macOS), I'd consider trying it out again. * Calendar: I use Fantastical. The day iOS Calendar makes it as fast and easy as Fantastical to set an appointment is the day I consider switching back. Probably still won't, though. * News: I use Twitter. No, seriously. I tried using iOS News for a time, but it always ended up giving me a bunch of news I didn't care about (no matter how many times I tried to provide feedback).


Gartenberg

It's hard to pick, so many third parties have exceeded but that's OK. Apple should be pushing developers to go far beyond native apps and show what's possible


Rene

When I clean-installed iOS 8, I started fresh and didn't download any apps I didn't need. Eighteen months later and I'm still using all of Apple's built-in apps and I'm as efficient and productive as ever. I don't use my inbox as a to-do list nor do I reduce it to zero, so I'm fine with Mail. But, as with all things Apple, search needs to be improved. I can find things faster using Spotlight from the Home screen than from within Mail, and that's flabbergasting.

I'd also like News to be a system-level service, combined with Siri recommendations, and Siri Reading List and Shared Links, then put the combined list back into all of those places. One News to rule them all.

Maps just needs to keep getting better. No mapping service is good enough, so constant improvement is all there is.

What about the App Store, what can Apple do there?


Serenity

In a nutshell, "Fix it." There's a lot of good inside the App Store — curated lists, great recommendations, and fantastic apps. But they often get buried in the noise. I'd love to see an App Store that looks more like For You in the Music app: a combination of custom-created and algorithmic information that gives you the best apps based on your tastes and past purchases.


Bader

Better search. Better search. Better search.

App discover has improved since Phil Schiller decided that the Featured panel should be updated more than once per week. I love the emphasis on local content and independent developers, and a renewed focus on pay-once utility apps over freemium games.

That said, discovering the myriad hidden gems on the App Store, especially on the gaming side, is still too difficult. I would love the equivalent of a personalized For You panel based on the apps I've downloaded and used.


Lory

Discovery in the App Store has been nothing short of abysmal since day one. I have been pleased with the way Apple staff takes care to spotlight certain apps and games that stand out, but it still seems like a lot of great content still gets lost in the constant barrage of daily app releases. I'd like one section that literally just shows every single new app that comes out every day. That section could have filters, like genres or current star ratings, but I want to be able to make those decisions myself. Why doesn't Apple let us see every single app that gets published in the App Store?

The search function in the App Store is also the worst I've ever used. How is it that I can type in the exact name of an app and it shows up tenth on the list, or sometimes not at all? Please, Apple, take some time to perfect the search function in the App Store.


Mikah

I want Genius for the App Store: "You launch this game more than any other game on your iPhone. You might also like …" I know, I know, we're pretty Google with that, but think about it: Apple already displays this information in your battery settings — why not make use of it to help you find apps that you'd enjoy?

Other than that, I hope Apple continues to do more of the same Re: App Store featuring. It's been nice opening up the App Store every day to find new apps worth checking out. It's a great change from the weekly features of yesteryear.


Gartenberg

It's tough. If I knew the answer I'd work for Ron Okamoto but it's hard to find new cool apps. It's something I hear over and over. "How do I stand out in the app store without knowing Phil Schiller's email?"


Rene

Yeah, better search. I get that iTunes infrastructure is from a previous age, but search is a solved problem. Like Serenity says, "For You" for Apps would be fantastic. So would App Store for iCloud.

I'm not sure what the future of apps is. Extensibility, which sets features free from binary blobs, Continuity, which syncs activities between devices, and App Thinning, which sends only the assets and content an app needs, when it needs it, have all fundamentally changed what it means to be an app.

How Apple continues to adapt to and push this future is what I'm most interested in seeing.

Xcode for iPad, is it time?


Serenity

I want it. But I don't know if we'll get a "full" version. I think something like Playgrounds for iPad is a much more likely start on the mobile platform, with full Xcode coming down the line.


Bader

The iPad a computer, right? So, yes.


Lory

The only thing I've ever used Xcode for is to take screenshots of my Apple TV, so I'm definitely not qualified to make a statement on whether it should be made available on iPad, but I will anyway. If Apple wants consumers to think of the iPad Pro as some version of a replacement for the laptop, then they should make programs like Xcode available on them. The iPad Pro doesn't have to look and act like a PC or Mac, but it should at least have most of the same content available in one form or another.


Mikah

Yes. Yes, please. If the iPad can run everything it needs to without a hiccup, this absolutely should happen.

Who knows, maybe Xcode for iPad is the thing that finally gets me to get serious about developing for iOS!


Gartenberg

iPad is a PC, treat it as such.


Rene

If it's done in a way developers can make full-on apps, then absolutely. A platform that can be used to develop its own apps is a full-on platform.

Developers will still want and need Macs for workflows and power, at least for a while, but the ability to code from iOS will be transformative.

HomeKit, how does it become more of a thing?


Serenity

More devices, and a central HomeKit app wouldn't be too shabby. The third-party options aren't bad at all, but this is a place where Apple could drive adoption of HomeKit acccessories with a great app and advertisements for the products in the HomeKit universe.


Bader

By talking about it! A HomeKit hub would be a good place to start (though an optional download, please!), but Apple really needs to take ownership of this category by grouping disparate experiences into a single place. The Apple Store app isn't the right place for this, either, because HomeKit products are primarily app- and Siri-based experiences.


Lory

The first suggestion on my list is price. Apple doesn't have very many partners in the internet-of-things department, and the ones they do have are producing high-end products. HomeKit would probably get more love from consumers if there were a bigger variety on what it costs to outfit your home with the latest technology. This would likely require Apple partnering with more companies and lowering the cost for developers to certify their products.

My second suggestion is a HomeKit app, one that acts as a hub for everything you have connected to it. It would be great to be able to open the HomeKit app and set a lighting scene, adjust the temperature, and time the door locks all at the same time, instead of having to open individual apps.


Mikah

Repeat after me: HomeKit app. HomeKit app. HomeKit app.

Did it work? I thought if we said it three times, a HomeKit app would appear.


Gartenberg

ack. It's a mess. I need to control all my stuff from one place. Third party apps shouldn't be needed


Rene

Home.app. There are third party apps that do the management, but if third-party apps are needed to do the management, it's a good indicator Apple needs to take ownership. So hopefully the internal tool gets polished and made external.

From there it's just the more accessories the better. Once you experience the magic of Siri controlling your home, you want it for everything.

Then you want it to do more of everything.

Bottom line time — what else would you love to see from iOS 10?


Serenity

Apple's direction for iOS for the next ten years. We got multitasking in iOS 4, iCloud and Siri in iOS 5, Maps in iOS 6, a new design interface in iOS 7, Continuity and HomeKit in iOS 8, and Smart Search in iOS 9. iOS 10 is a chance for Apple to take all of the features of the past and set a roadmap for future mobile greatness — and make the iPad a first-class computing citizen, while the company's at it.


Bader

iOS 9 introduced so many iPad-specific features, it almost felt like the iPhone was overlooked. Context and improved Spotlight Search have proven useful, sure, but I'd love to see Apple recommit to making the iPhone the best pocket computer in the world. A better home screen; more powerful camera app; improved notification workflow. Those are the easy ones. The one I'd really love to see, as a mobile payments geek? Making Apple Pay into a fully-functioning platform, with an open API that leverages its existing convenience and security.


Lory

I'd like to see better practical use for Siri, major overhauls for the built-in apps, and a bunch of new wallpapers, especially Dynamic wallpapers. I'm bored with floating bubbles. At least give me some new shapes.


Mikah

Make Siri great again for real this time. I think if I'm going to have a virtual assistant across my devices (including macOS if rumors hold up), I want it to be powerful and helpful and accurate and trustworthy. Apple, I hope you're looking at Siri and telling it to get its act together for the good of all Applekind.

Other than that, just the typical desires: more battery life, fewer crashes (already rare), feature-rich apps, and a matter transporter.


Gartenberg

A lot of things, I won't likely see. I think it's time for a new UI, something that feels well beyond the first iPhone. We're not there yet.


Rene

My list goes on! Lock screen complications, so I can get activity, weather, scores, and other data without having to open my iPhone or iPad. System-wide night mode or theme engine, a customizable Control Center, rich notifications with enough interface inside them for deeper interactions, FaceTime conference calls, leaderboards and challenges in Activities so those of us who are extrinsically motivated can compete with each other on the road to fitness, A Synergy-style hub where communications are aggregated by contact, not locked in app silos. Yeah, on and on...

iPhone is the most important device I have. It can never be too convenient, so anything that makes doing more easier, I'm all up for. iPad is the future of computers, so anything that makes it as powerful as possible without losing its approachability, I'm also all up for.

Those are the north stars. Make my life easier and let me do more from anywhere.