What happens when you drop your AirPods 21 stories down an elevator shaft? Asking for a friend…

Everyone has those off-days where you just can't seem to get anything done without messing up:

Maybe you spill your coffee on yourself on your way to work. Maybe you accidentally forgot to wear clean underwear. Maybe you drop your AirPods down a 21-story elevator shaft, which is exactly what happened to Reddit user XxAuthenticxX.

If anyone is looking for the ultimate AirPod drop test result look no further! The horror I felt as I watched my right AirPod roll into the crack of the elevator on the 19th floor is something I have never felt from dropping an electronic before. (XxAuthenticxX)

While all hope seemed lost at first (along with XxAuthenticxX's AirPod's…) two helpful maintenance men quickly swooped in and came to the rescue.

And — believe it or not — the AirPods survived the plunge.

We found [them] at the bottom of the shaft on the concrete floor. I've been testing the sound against the left one and they work perfectly fine! (XxAuthenticxX)

Oh, and incase you were like "PICZ OR IT DIDN'T HAPPEN!!1!":

Welp. Now we know how rugged these things are. Thanks, Apple!

Has your tech ever died from a fall?

Are you someone who's notorious for cracking iPhone screens or destroying computers (accidentally, of course…) or are you someone who's SUPER careful with their tech?

Let us know what you think in the comments below!

Cella Lao Rousseau

Cella writes for iMore on social and photography. She's a true crime enthusiast, bestselling horror author, lipstick collector, buzzkill, and Sicilian. Follow her on Twitter and Instagram: @hellorousseau

3 Comments
  • Actually, they probably reach critical velocity within the first foot, so they will hit the ground with the same force falling from a table to the floor as they would falling 21 stories.
  • More research is needed.™
  • Of course they survived. You could drop them off the Chrysler Building and they'd survive that too, as would most in ear headphones. It's basic physics/terminal velocity calculations.