iPhone and iPad glossary

iPhone and iPad glossary

New to iPhone, iPod touch, iPad, or Apple TV and looking for a glossary of terms or dictionary to help you know what all this tech-talk really means? From iOS or iCloud, from Siri to iMessage, from Jailbreak to SSH, look no further, we’ve got you -- and every definition we can think of -- covered below!

Looking for more? Here are a few other glossary's you might enjoy:

(Are we missing something? Add any additions or corrections to the comments below!)

0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

0-9

  • 2G: Second generation data networking used by iPhone and iPad. Think of this like old-fashioned dial-up modems. (see EDGE.)

  • 3G: Third generation data networking used by iPhone and iPad. Think of this like base level broadband Internet (cable/DSL). 3G is symbolized on the iPhone and iPad by 3G next to the carrier logo. (see HSPA and EVDO.)

  • 4G: Forth generation data networking, originally intended for use with full LTE systems. Also a marketing term used by Sprint for WiMax, T-Mobile for HSPA+, and AT&T for HSPA+. Think of this as super-fast broadband Internet (cable/fiber). (See HSPA, HSPA+, LTE)

  • 802.11: The standard used for WLAN (wide local area network), typically referred to as Wi-Fi, connections on iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. While older models supported only 802.11b/g, 2010 models added support for the faster, longer range 802.11n standard. (Only iPad supports 802.11n on the clearer 5Mhz frequency, however.)

A

  • A2DP: Advanced Audio Distribution Profile is a Bluetooth standard used to transmit and receive stereo music. Added to iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad in iOS 3. It's what lets you send iPod music to your wireless stereo Bluetooth headset.
  • Achievements: Some iOS games reward you with bonus points with specific achievements (See Game Center)
  • ActiveSync: Microsoft's Exchange push mail, calendar, contact, etc. protocol licensed by Apple for Mac OS X and iOS's Mail app, and by Google for Google Sync.
  • Ad hoc: A way to distribute apps outside the app store. Limited to 100 UDIDs (devices) per developer account.
  • Airplane Mode: A Setting on iPhone and iPad that turns off all radios, including cellular voice, data, Bluetooth, and Wi-Fi. Called Airplane Mode because these radios are typically required to be turned off while on an airplane.
  • AirPlay: Let's you stream video from iPhone, iPod touch, iPad, or iTunes on a Mac or PC to an Apple TV, and audio to an Airport Express or other compatible speaker system
  • AirPrint: Let's you print from any iOS device from an AirPrint compatible printer
  • Android: Google's open-source mobile operating system. It's used primarily in smartphones but also can be found on tablets, Mobile Internet Devices (MIDs) or even in kitchen appliances and automobile navigation. (see AndroidCentral.com)
  • API: (Application Programming Interface) Part of the iOS SDK provided by Apple to developers that allows them to access official, publicly available functionality in their apps.
  • App: Short for "application." The programs you download and run on a smartphone. Can be free, or for sale. Most apps come from Apple’s iTunes App Store but some can be made specifically by and for businesses or schools, and some are made expressly for the Jailbreak Cydia app store.
  • App Store: Part of iTunes on Windows and Mac and a built-in app on iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad, App Store is the only place to buy 3rd party apps and games for iOS. Introduced in 2008 alongside iOS 2 and iPhone 3G.
  • Apple: Pioneering personal computer company founded by Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak, one of the most popular consumer electronics companies, and maker of iPhone, iPod touch, iPad, and Apple TV (among other things).
  • Apple ID: An email address registered with Apple, typically for iTunes, the Apple Online Store, or Apple Discussion groups. (Not yet unified so you may actually have several Apple IDs.)
  • Apple Store: A retail and online powerhouse that sells, and in the case of retail, services all Apple products including iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad.
  • Apple TV: Apple's original, Mac OS X Tiger-based living room set-top box designed to buy media from the iTunes Store or stream it from Mac or Windows iTunes.
  • Apple TV 2: iOS-based second generation set-top box focused on streaming via Home Sharing or AirPlay, renting from the iTunes Store, and Netflix subscription content.
  • AT&T: One of the four major U.S. carriers. Formerly the exclusive carrier of Apple’s iPhone in the US, still the only GSM carrier with iPhone in the US and the only carrier providing service for the iPad 3G.
  • AVCTP: Audio/Video Control Transport Protocol allows for the transmission of basic music controls between devices and accessories. Only properly supported for iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad since iOS 4. It's what lets you play, pause, fast forward, rewind, and skip through music and video via wireless stereo Bluetooth headsets.

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B

  • Banner notification: Unobtrusive notification that rolls down from the top of the screen to alert you to new messages.
  • Baseband: The Modem Firmware of your iPhone
  • Blog: (weB LOG) a ongoing internet-based publication, in chronological format, often focusing on a mix of news, commentary, and analysis, with frequent links to other sites on the web. (TiPb is a blog.)
  • Bluetooth: Named after a Danish King (seriously), Bluetooth is a wireless technology used for exchanging short-range (under 30-feet) data between electronic devices. iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad support Bluetooth 2.1 + EDR (Enhanced Data Rate) for better security and simpler pairing. Apple currently supports Bluetooth for wireless phone headsets, stereo headsets, keyboard connections, and data tethering.
  • Bookmarklet: A Safari bookmark that contains JavaScript code to create additional functionality. Prior to iOS 4.2, Find in Page was a popular bookmarklet.

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C

  • Calendar: One of Apple's built-in apps, it handles events, invitations, and reminders on iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad.
  • Camera:: Built-in Apple app that handles the taking of photos and videos on iPhone and iPod touch 4.
  • Carrier: A company that provides cell phone service.
  • CES: North America's largest consumer electronics show, held in January at the Las Vegas Convention Center.
  • CDMA: Code Division Multiple Access is an underlying network standard and the common abbreviation for CDMA2000, the technology used by Verizon and Sprint in the US.
  • CDMA2000: The networking technology used by Verizon and Sprint. A single CDMA tower typically has a longer range and thus provide greater coverage than a single GSM tower.
  • Cocoa Touch: Apple's iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad Objective-C-based API framework. Used to create iOS apps in Xcode.
  • Cook, Tim: Chief Operating Officer at Apple. He makes sure things run on time, on budget, all the time. Cook ran Apple during Steve Jobs' leave of absence.
  • CSS: (Cascading Style Sheets) are used to style and control the formatting of HTML documents such as web pages.
  • Cydia: Created by Jay Freeman (Saurik) in March 2008, Cydia is an application for jailbroken iOS devices that allows for the purchase and installation of 3rd party extensions or apps that Apple does not allow in the App Store.

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D

  • DFU Mode: Device Firmware Update mode, most commonly used to exploit and gain access to iOS in order to Jailbreak. Requires holding down the Sleep/Wake button for 3 seconds, then also holding down the Home button for 10 seconds, releasing Sleep/Wake and continuing to hold Home for 5 or more seconds until the screen goes black.
  • Dock: Special row of icons (or Folders post-iOS 4) along the bottom of iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad that do not change when you swipe between Home Screens.
  • Dock port: Apple's proprietary 30-pin interface used to connect iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad to a Mac or Windows PC via USB for syncing, or to connect to a variety of accessories for charging, audio, video, and more.

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E

  • Early Termination Fee: Also known as an ETF, it's what a carrier chargers you to break out of your contract. Usually are prorated.
  • EDGE: Enhanced Data Rates for GSM Evolution, also called 2G, 2.5G or 2.75G depending on the data speed, is an older data network used by carriers like AT&T. The original iPhone was EDGE-only. Current iPhones can use EDGE when 3G is not available (or on T-Mobile in the US where 3G frequencies aren’t compatible). Real world EDGE speeds max out around 150Kbps and do not allow simultaneous voice and data (calls will not come through while using EDGE data). EDGE is symbolized on the iPhone and iPad by the uppercase letter E. iPhone 4 and iPad support EDGE on the 850, 900, 1800, 1900 MHz frequencies.
  • EVDO: EVolution Data Optimized is the 3G networking technology used by CDMA carriers like Verizon. EVDO Rev A can achieve speeds up to 3.1 Mbps but cannot handle simultaneous voice and data, but does allow incoming calls to come through during an active data session. (Answering an incoming call will shut off the data connection.) EVDO Rev B can handle voice and data but is not planned for deployment by any US carriers. iPhone 4 supports CDMA EV-DO Rev. A on 800, 1900 MHz.

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F

  • Facebook: Currently the largest social network on the internet, built on the concept of friend-to-friend connections. One of the few, and the biggest, places on the web Google is excluded from.
  • FaceTime Apple's video calling service. Requires Wi-Fi and is currently only supported via phone number on iPhone and Apple ID email address on iPod touch 4 and Mac (beta).
  • FairPlay DRM: Apple's DRM (digital rights management) security, used to protect iTunes movies, TV shows, music videos, apps, and iBooks from piracy. FairPlay can be authorized on up to 5 Windows and Mac machines at one time and a similar number of iOS devices.
  • Fast App Switcher: Apple's multitasking dock, hidden behind the regular dock and accessible under iOS 4 and later version by double clicking the Home Button.
  • Flash: An application for developing interactive web content and the web plugin required to use it. Originally developed by Macromedia for frame-based vector animation, now owned by Adobe. Flash player is not supported by iPhone, iPod touch, or iPad. (Apple thinks it's a dead technology and wants HTML5 instead. Adobe thinks Apple is crazy.)
  • Folder: An icon representing a group of apps. Introduced in iOS 4 they are created by dragging on app on top of the other in Jiggly Mode, and deleted by removing all the apps. iPhone and iPod touch can currently hold 12 apps per Folder. iPad can hold 20.
  • Force Quit: In the Fast App Switcher, tapping and holding an app will put it in Jiggly Mode and tapping the X badge will force it to quit. Built-in apps like Mail and Messages will automatically and immediately restart while 3rd party apps will restart the next time you launch them.
  • Forstall, Scott Senior Vice President of iOS software, came to Apple from NeXT with Steve Jobs. He's in charge of everything that makes your iPhone, iPod touch, iPad, and Apple TV run.

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G

  • Game Center: Apple’s gaming portal where you can discover new games and share your game experiences with friends from around the globe
  • Genius Bar: A counter located in Apple Retail Stores where Mac, iPhone, iPod, and iPad users can make appointments and get service for their products.
  • Gmail: Google's web-based e-mail service. Can be set up as an Exchange account on iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad
  • Google: The biggest company on the net and the provider of the maps data, YouTube videos, and Gmail for iOS users.
  • GPRS: General Packet Radio Service is the oldest and slowest form of data networking available to GSM iPhones and iPads. Data rates are typically below 50 Kbps. GPRS is symbolized on the iPhone and iPad by the lowercase letter o.
  • GSM: Global System for Mobile communication is the underlying technology standard used by AT&T and T-Mobile in the US and the majority of carriers in Europe and around the world.

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H

  • Hack (Hacking): Modifying a Jailbroken iOS device in order to change or enhance functionality.
  • Home Button: The physical hardware button on the front of the iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad, beneath the screen. Used to wake, return to the Home Screen, cycle between the Home Screen and Spotlight Search screen, open the Fast App Switcher, and optionally enabled Accessibility features.
  • Home Screen: The front end of Apple's Springboard app launcher that consists of 11 screens that hold app icons, Folders, the Dock, the Fast App Switcher, and the Spotlight Search screen.
  • HSPA: High Speed Packet Access is a fast form of 3G data networking. The iPhone and iPad support HSPA up to 7.2 Mbps (AT&T currently supports up to 14 Mbps in some areas). Typically split into HSDPA (download) and HSUPA (uplink/upload). iPhone 4 and iPad support UMTS/HSPA on the 850, 900, 1900, 2100 MHz frequencies.
  • HSPA+: Enhanced High Speed Packet Access is a faster form of 3G data networking, now called 4G in T-Mobile and AT&T’s marketing. Apple will support HSPA+ in 2011. Top speeds can reach 56 Mbps. Bell and Telus currently offer 21 Mbps HSPA+.
  • HTML: (HyperText Markup Language) is a standard for structuring text, images, and other content for display in web browsers such as iOS Safari. Tags are used to mark the beginning and end of elements that are then either styled by CSS or turned into actions like web links.

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I

  • iBooks: Apple's eBook reader, available from the App Store. It handles the standard ePub format protected by FairPlay DRM, and PDF. Introduced in 2010 alongside the iPad.
  • iBookstore: iTunes for iBooks, it allows you to browse, search, and buy iBook format eBooks.
  • iCloud: Apple's online services, replacing MobileMe and integrating with all iOS devices and OS X Mac computers.
  • iMessage: An SMS/MMS-like system for sending free text and multimedia messages from one iOS device to another over cellular or Wi-Fi networks.
  • iPad: Apple's first tablet device, announced in January 2010 and released in April of the same year. It runs a modified version of iOS optimized for its larger, 9.7" screen.
  • iOS: Apple mobile operating system and the software that powers the iPhone, iPod touch, iPad, and Apple TV.
  • iOS SDK: Apple's official Software Development Kit for iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad containing Cocoa Touch frameworks, APIs, development tools, and other elements necessary to create iOS apps.
  • iOS 2: Originally called iPhone 2.0 it was announced at the first ever Apple Preview Event in 2008 and was released alongside iPhone 3G on June 29 of the same year. Major new features included an SDK for developers, and App Store for 3rd party apps, and support for Apple’s MobileMe service.
  • iOS 3: Originally called iPhone 3.0 it was announced at the second Apple Preview Event in 2009 and released prior to the iPhone 3GS on June 17 of the same year. Major new features included copy/paste, MMS, and tethering (unsupported by AT&T).
  • iOS 4: Announced at the third Apple Preview Event in 2010 and released prior to iPhone 4 on June 21 of the same year. Major new features included multitasking, folders, and FaceTime video calling.
  • iPhone 2G: Original iPhone announced at Macworld 2007 and released June 29 of the same year. Major innovations included the multitouch user interface.
  • iPhone 3G: Second iPhone announced at WWDC 2008 and released July 11 of the same year. Major new features included a 3G radio and an all new design.
  • iPhone 3GS: Third iPhone announced at WWDC 2009 and released June 19 of the same year. Major new features included faster processors and video recording.
  • iPhone 4: Forth iPhone announced at WWDC 2010 and released June 24 of the same year. Major new features included an A4 processor, Retina Display, front facing camera, and an all new design.
  • iPhone 4S: Fifth iPhone announced fall 2011 and released October 11 of the same year. Major new features included an A5 processor, Siri, and an enhanced 8mp/1080p rear camera.
  • iPod touch G1: Apple's first generation multitouch, full screen, internet enabled iPod released September 5, 2007.
  • iPod touch G2: Apple's second generation iPod touch, it added volume buttons and a built-in speaker. Released September 9, 2008.
  • iPod touch G3: Apple's third generation iPod touch, it added more RAM and faster CPU and GPU. Released September 9, 2009.
  • iPod touch G4: Apple's fourth generation iPod touch, it added a Retina Display, front and back facing cameras with FaceTime, and a gyroscope.
  • iTunes: Mac and Windows software used to activate and sync iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Also used to manage music, movies, TV shows, apps, books, and other media, and access the Ping social music network. Currently on version 10, released September 2010.
  • iTunes app: iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad app used on-device to access the iTunes Store and Ping social network.
  • iTunes Connect: Apple's developer portal. Used to submit apps for review by Apple, and to manage them by developers, including setting price and availability.
  • iTunes in the Cloud: Part of iCloud, iTunes in the Cloud allows you to re-download apps, and depending on your location, iTunes Music, iBooks, and TV Shows as well.
  • iTunes Match: Apple's $24.99/year cloud-based music locker service.
  • iTunes Store: Online store run by Apple for purchasing music, movies, TV shows, and apps, and downloading podcasts and other media. Accessible via iTunes on Mac or Windows or the iTunes app on iPhone, iPod touch, or iPad.

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J

  • Jailbreak: Breaking open the root jail Apple uses to secure iOS, allowing a user to customize the device and install apps outside of the App Store. Also required for AT&T carrier unlock.
  • JavaScript: Scripting language, not at all related to Java, used by web pages to program enhanced functionality and interactivity.
  • Jiggly Mode: Tap and hold an app and it will begin to "jiggle", indicating you can move them around the Home Screen, from screen to screen, put them into folders, delete them by tapping their X badge (App Store apps only), or Force Quit them if they're in the Fast App Switcher.
  • Jobs, Steve: Co-founder and CEO of Apple and product visionary behind iPod, iTunes, iPhone, iPad, etc.

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K

  • Kernel: The basic Unix building block of iOS. Like Apple’s Mac, iOS devices are based on the BSD-derived Darwin kernel.
  • KHTML: The original Linux browser technology WebKit, and hence Apple's Safari comes from.

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L

  • LDAP: (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol) can view and search contacts on your company or organization’s LDAP server
  • LTE: Long Term Evolution is a 4G networking technology currently being deployed by Verizon and scheduled to be deployed by AT&T, Canadian carriers, and others. Theoretical speeds are measured in the hundreds of Mbps but initial implementations haven’t reached those yet. Likewise initial implementations only use LTE for data while future versions could be pure IP-based for both voice and data. Neither iPhone nor iPad yet support LTE.
  • Lock Screen info: Popup or list of notifications shown when the iPhone is locked but woken from sleep.

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M

  • Mail: Built-in Apple app for handling POP3, IMAP, MobileMe, and Exchange/ActiveSync email accounts.
  • Messages: One of Apple's built-in iPhone apps that handles SMS text messages and MMS multimedia messages.
  • MMS: (MultimediaMmessages), introduced in iOS 3 and support images, videos, sound, contact cards, and location. Sent and received via the Messages app on iPhone to other mobile/cell phones.
  • MobileMe: Apple's old push mail, calendar, and contacts service for iOS. Now replaced by iCloud.

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N

  • Newsstand: A special folder in iOS 5 that collects together magazine and newspaper apps and allows for automatic downloading of new issues.
  • NeXT: Company founded by Steve Jobs after he was ejected from Apple. Ultimately purchased by Apple, prefacing the return of Jobs. NeXT technology, like NeXTStep evolved into the foundations of Mac OS X and iOS.
  • NeXTSTEP: Objective-C programming framework purchased by Apple as part of the NeXT acquisition and evolved into Cocoa on Mac OS X and Cocoa Touch on iOS.
  • Nitro: Apple's JavaScript rendering engine used in the WebKit-based Safari browser for Mac, Windows, and iOS.
  • Notification Center: Pull down list of recent notifications accessible from any iOS Home Screen or from within any iOS app.

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O

  • Objective-C: Apple's superset of the C programming language used as part of the Cocoa Touch APIs to create iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad apps. Derived from NeXT's NeXTSTEP.
  • Open GL: An open source 3D graphics library used in many devices, including iOS devices
  • Open Source: Software which is licensed to grant the right of users to study, change, and improve its design through the availability of its source code. BSD Unix, the foundation of Mac OS and iOS, as well a WebKit are examples of Open Source software.
  • Open Standard: A technology developed and/or agreed upon by a governing or controlling body available for any organization to license (licensing fees may be involved). H.264 video is an example of an open standard that requires a licensing fee.
  • OTA: (Over the Air) The act of moving data to your phone -- downloading, really -- without having to plug it in. iOS devices can buy music, download apps, sync data, etc. OTA.

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P

  • Photos: Built-in Apple app that handles the camera roll for iPhone and iPod touch 4, and synced photos and videos for iPhone and all generations of iPad and iPod touch.
  • Personal Hotspot: Introduced with the Verizon iPhone and iOS 4.3 it replaces Tethering and, on iPhone 4, adds the ability to share cellular data over a Wi-Fi connection with up to 5 additional devices. Availability will depend on carriers and some may/will charge extra for it. Think of it as a built-in MiFi or the ability to turn your iPhone into a mini mobile Wi-Fi router.
  • Photo Stream: Part of iCloud, Photo Stream stores your last 30 days or 1000 photos online and on your iOS devices, and all your photos on your Mac.
  • Ping: Apple's social music network launched in September 2010 alongside the fourth generation iPod touch. It lives inside iTunes on Mac, Windows, and iOS and is hooked into Twitter.
  • Private API: An API that may or may not be used by Apple but isn't finished, polished, or otherwise approved for developers to use in App Store apps. Apple will reject any app that uses a Private API.
  • Public API: An API approved by Apple and made available in the iOS SDK. Public API's are a guarantee by Apple that developers can use them and not worry Apple will make changes, which could result in apps crashing or having experiencing other bugs.

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Q

  • QuickTime: Apple's 2D graphics layer, used to play movies and other video on iOS.

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R

  • Respring: Relaunching iPhone, iPod touch, or iPad's Springboard. Typically used by Jailbreak apps after installation or changes to Springboard.
  • Retina Display: 960x640, 326ppi display available on iPhone 4 and iPod touch 4.

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S

  • Safari: Apple's web browser, both for Mac OS X and iOS (sometimes called Mobile Safari). Based on KHTML/WebKit renderer and the Nitro JavaScript engine.
  • Schiller, Phil: Senior Vice President of Marketing at Apple. When Steve Jobs was on leave of absence, Schiller stepped in to the Keynote hot seat.
  • SDK: (Software Developers Kit) a set of tools, including API, frameworks, interface elements, etc. used to create software, i.e. apps.
  • SHSH Blobs: (Signature HaSH) is a 128-byte digital signature generated by Apple and used to verify firmware on iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Since Apple will not verify older firmware, SHSH blobs are typically saved to Cydia or services like Tiny Umbrella by Jailbreakers so they can rollback to older firmware.
  • SIM card: The little card used in GSM phones (AT&T, Rogers, O2, etc.) that connects the phone to the network.
  • Siri: Apple's intelligent virtual assistant that replaces VoiceControl on the iPhone 4S.
  • Sleep/Wake Button: Physical hardware button on top of the iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Used to power on, wake from sleep, put to sleep, and power down iOS devices.
  • SMS: (Short Message Service) Text messages sent from the Messages app on iPhone to other cell/mobile phones.
  • Spotlight Search: Part of the iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad Home Screen system, accessible by swiping left to right or clicking the Home Button when on the primary Home Screen, or inside Apple apps like Messages, Mail, Contacts, iPod, etc. Performs text-based search and shows results for contacts, apps, music, podcasts, videos, audiobooks, notes, mail, calendar events, and SMS messages.
  • Springboard: The internal name of the program Apple uses to run the iOS home screen, including the app launcher and fast app switcher.
  • Sprint: One of the four major U.S. carriers.
  • SSH: (Secure SHell) is a secure network communication protocol used to communicate between Mac or Windows and a Jailbroken iOS device. Apple defaults all iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad SSH passwords to "alpine", which should be changed for security reasons if SSH is enabled.
  • Sync: Short for synchronize; the

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T

  • T-Mobile: One of the four major U.S. carriers.
  • Tethering: Sharing your iPhone's cellular data connection with your laptop via USB (dock cable) or wirelessly via Bluetooth. Available since iOS 3 though AT&T only chose to support it with iOS 4. Not available on all carriers and some carriers charge extra for it. Replaced in iOS 4.3 with Personal Hotspot.
  • Twitter: One of the most popular social networks built around a follower/following system rather than friends, and limited to 140 characters (think micro-blog meets SMS).

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U

  • UDID: (Unique Device Identifier) The series of numbers and letters used by Apple and developers to uniquely identify your iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Your UDID needs to be registered with Apple's developer program to run beta versions of iOS and needs to be included in developer's provisioning files to run Ad Hoc apps.
  • UTMS: Universal Mobile Telecommunications System is a 3G, transitioning to 4G networking technology. WCDMA (including HSPA) is part of UTMS.
  • USB: Stands for Universal Serial Bus. Is a method of connecting devices to a computer. Apple iOS devices connect via dock port to your computer’s USB port.

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V

  • Verizon: One of the four major U.S. carriers. Currently the only CDMA carrier in the US to offer the iPhone 4. Also currently offers the iPad + MiFi combo.
  • VPN: (Virtual Private Network) provides secure access over the Internet to private networks, such as the network at your company or school.

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W

  • WCDMA: Wideband Code Division Multiple Access is a UTMS technology which, while easily confused with the CDMA network used by Verizon, is actually associated with GSM networks like HSPA.
  • WebKit: Apple supported open source HTML browser rendering engine that forms the foundation of Safari on Mac, Windows, and iOS. Also used by Google's Chrome, Palm webOS, Nokia, and others.
  • Wi-Fi: A trademark of the Wi-Fi Alliance, commonly used to refer to 802.11g (pre-2010 iOS devices) or 802.11n (post-2010 iOS devices) wireless networking.

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X

  • Xcode: Apple's IDE (Integrated Development Environment) used to write Objective C code and create native App Store apps.

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Y

  • YouTube: Google's web-based streaming video service. Accessible from iPhone or iPod touch via the YouTube app, or iPad either inline or via the YouTube app.
  • YouTube app: One of Apple's built-in iOS apps that allows searching, browsing, and playback of H.264 format YouTube videos.

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Z

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Rene Ritchie

Editor-in-Chief of iMore, co-host of Iterate, Debug, ZEN and TECH, MacBreak Weekly. Cook, grappler, photon wrangler. Follow him on Twitter, App.net, Google+.

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There are 27 comments. Add yours.

Jeff says:

Very informative.. It's much appreciated

AmiPro says:

I remember seeing this or similar post earlier. Why repostng old stuff?

Luis says:

because i didnt see it?

Rene Ritchie says:

We had a static page version and wanted to make it better, expand it, and move it over to the blog proper. Consider it the newer, better glossary!

56K says:

Need to update AT&T and Verizon

Alex says:

Good idea. Some arbitrary omissions I notice:
Apple ID
Bookmarklet
Sync
Will post additional replies if I notice others.

Jefferson Kent says:

As I would have liked to have said to Dr. Johnson, "Good beginning"
How about Recovery Mode, reset, reboot, soft or hard resets, and a lot more that I will think of as soon as I press Submit.
How about a Wiki type page with user suggestions and a group of users to decide which entries are appropriate?

Ben says:

Looks like "CES" became part of the description for "CDMA" instead of a new bullet.

(Copy of) Dev says:

Not a bad list. Some corrections/suggestions:
1) "Open Source" does not have its own entry -- it looks like you missed a tag, since it is mashed into the "Open GL" entry
2) "Open Source" - I would also take away the phrasing "liberally licensed," simply because so many commenters seem to go into a red state/blue state rage with that phrase, and some Open Source licenses are actually fairly strict.
3) An entry on "Open Standard" might belong, but would there is little chance you could come upon a good definition, as H.264, Microsoft OOXML, and Flash are all "Open Standards" by some versions of the definition, and not by others. Probably best to leave that one alone :)
4) "Flash" probably deserves its own entry here, if only to point out its absence and why.
6) "H.264" deserves its own entry, as Apple is pushing it so strongly. (WebVM may or may not deserve one as a competing format, judgement call.)
7) "HTML5" deserves a callout in the HTML section, or perhaps even a separate entry, not because it is a separate entity but because in the mobile space it is tossed around as a buzzword so often.
8) "KHTML" missing a "where", also might be worth pointing out that Chrome and Android browsers are also based on it, though you mention that in WebKit entry.
9) "API" makes it seem like APIs are a creation of Apple.iOS. It should probably read something like "a set of rules and specifications developers can follow to access resources and functions of the underlying operating system and hardware. Apple provides a well regarded set of official APIs in the iOS SDK."
10) Similarly, "public/private APIs" should be similarly broadened to indicate they are general software concepts, and something that Apple provides, not something Apple invented.
11) "Podcast (or podcasting)" probably deserves its own entry, or maybe I just think that because I listen to so many on my iPhone :)

chirmer says:

Awesome list! Very informative, and I learned quite a bit from reading it :)
Only suggestions I had were corrections already mentioned: CES is part of the CDMA description, and AT&T/Verizon need to be updated (understandable since most of the writing on this was done before the announcement I'm guessing).
Again, love it! Definitely bookmarking this page.

Drew Johnson says:

Microsim needs to be added

jp99 says:

Becoming out of date now - especially in regards to LTE developments, Sprint's iPhone offering, etc.

Forex says:

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Catharine Babers says:

Event, you're absolutely right about the race issue. There have always been prejudices of other minorities, laws barring people of certain ethnicities and religions? from enjoying the same equal protection and rights under the law.

Monty Caravella says:

You know I really can't say which is better. What I can tell you is that I am through with the Sprint company. With Sprint I am paying twice as much as Boost mobile customers even though sprint owns Boost? I just wrote an email to Mr. Hesse CEO of Sprint/Boost and I already feel far better. If you like me are mad about the absurdity that is Sprint visit the following website and email the CEO of Sprint.

Felecia Hice says:

I'm tired of following the rumors, but I am leaning towards the conservative side of expectations. WSJ's repoters are directly connected to Apple and that's where Apple plants leaks, so if they say only one iPhone that looks like an iPhone 4GS then I would bet good money on that.

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