Camera

How to use the camera flash on your iPhone

The Camera app can not only take photos, it can take flash photos when there's not enough light for anything else. Make no mistake — mobile flash photography still stinks no matter the quality of the tiny elements involved. However, whether you have a single or dual LED on your iPhone camera, they can help you capture important moments at low-light levels that would otherwise be impossible. So, to get the best photo you can, regardless of whether the you'e facing twilight to incandescence, tungsten or florescent, something cool blue or warm yellow, or any combination in between, you can set up and use the iPhone flash.

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How to use live camera filters on your iPhone

Apple has added basic color and effect filters to both the Camera and Photos app on the iPhone. The new filters apply to the still and square cameras. They don't apply to the video or panorama cameras. If you apply one, they're live and you'll see them in the preview the way they'll look when the photo is taken. They're subtle, as filters go. Mono, Tonal, Noir, Fade, Chrome, Process, Transfer, and Instant. There are three types of black and white, one desaturated, one over saturated, and and one each that tint towards blue, red, and green. Nothing blown out, nothing vignetted, and nothing overly dramatic. Best of all, they're easy to use!

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#CESLive: Expanding iPhone Photography with Olloclip

The iPhone's camera has improved in leaps and bounds - optical quality is better than ever, and Apple's attention to the sensor, combined with better software, makes it possible to take truly stunning photos with your device. But there's always room for improvement.

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Retina iPad mini iSight and FaceTime HD camera tests

The iSight camera in the Retina mini remains unchanged from last year's original. It's still the same 5 megapixel, backside illuminated (BSI), five-element, hybrid IR file red, and f/2.4 aperture. What has changed is the Apple A7 processor inside, and the image signal processor (ISP) inside it. That's 2 generations ahead in terms of imaging technology, which includes auto white balance, focus, exposure, face-detection, and more. In daylight, when the sun is flooding it with photons, there won't be much if any difference. When it comes to low-light, however, the A7 ISP pulls a little more detail out of the darkness, same as the iPad Air, but certainly nowhere near as good as the superior optics in the iPhone 5s. So the question becomes, how good - or bad - is it?

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How good is the iPhone 5s camera? Enough to impress a National Geographic photographer!

On a recent trip to the Scottish Highlands, National Geographic photographer Jim Richardson decided to leave his Nikon DSLR camera at home and, instead, see what the iPhone 5s would allow him to capture. Turns out, a lot - and more than he expected. From the National Geographic's Proof:

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iPhone 5s vs iPhone 5c vs iPhone 5: iSight camera shootout!

The iPhone 5s once again shows Apple's focus on cameras, bringing several improvements to the 8 megapixel iSight camera on the back. These include a dual LED white/yellow flash called True Tone, a larger f/2.2 aperture, bigger 1.5mm pixel sensor, and, of course, the next generation image signal processor (ISP) in the new Apple A7 chipset. What does this mean for overall, every day photo quality? What does it mean for skin tones and low-light? What does it mean for motion and dynamic range? And how does it compare to the also just-launched iPhone 5c and last year's similarly equipped iPhone 5? Let's take a look!

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How to enable the camera grid on your iPhone or iPad

The Camera app on your iPhone, iPod touch, or iPad has an optional grid that can help you better frame people, pets, and objects, horizons and celestial bodies — pretty much anything at all in your photos. Using the rules of thirds can elevate your pictures from the ordinary to the extra ordinary, and all with the flip of a toggle!

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How to record slow motion videos on your iPhone

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How to take photos with your iPhone or iPad

The Camera app on the iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad means you're never more than a swipe or tap or two from taking a picture and capturing a magic moment. While the camera app might look simple, there's a lot going on inside. It has auto-focus and auto-exposure, and both can be changed with just a tap of the screen. There are also options for high dynamic range (HDR), to switch between rear-facing and front-facing cameras, and even live filters and burst mode.

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How to record a video with your iPhone or iPad

The Camera app on the iPhone and iPad isn't just for taking still shots. With access to both the 1080p iSight camera on the back and the 720p FaceTime camera on the front, it's also great for shooting video of everything and anything, from sports to kids to pets to breaking news to moving selfies.

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