Isight

How to fix the rear iSight camera in your iPhone: The ultimate guide

If the rear iSight camera on your iPhone either isn't working or shows imperfections in photos, it's possible that the camera assembly itself is defective or damaged. While defects typically just arise for no reason, a damaged iSight camera could be caused from a hard fall. Typical symptoms of a broken or defective iSight camera include a blacked out screen when trying to take a picture, purple or blue blemishes on the screen that also appear in the resulting photo, and lines going through the screen either while snapping photos or that just appear in the final photo. What iPhone you have will dictate how difficult a DIY repair will be. Luckily, we've got the guide you need to get the job done from start to finish!

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Shooting and editing photos with the iPhone 5 and Photoshop Express

A decade ago I spent thousands of dollars and spent months shooting, developing, and editing photos for a book I was working on. It was an incredibly expensive, incomprehensibly wasteful process. Now I get not only less expensive but better photos with the iPhone 5s and apps in my pocket. and that's nothing compared to what Robin Jasmer is getting with his iPhone 5 and Photoshop Express:

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How to replace the rear iSight camera in an iPhone 5

The iPhone 5 comes equipped with an 8 megapixel rear iSight camera. It's a great camera, as long as it's functioning properly. However, if you're experiencing issues with your rear camera and you're out of warranty, replacing it yourself could be a lot cheaper than a new iPhone. Symptoms could include a black screen, hazing in images, spots showing up in photos, or lines through photos. If any of these problems sound like something you've experienced, it may be time to DIY replace your camera.

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The mobile camera war is currently being fought in glass, in chips, in apps, and on the cloud. Where should iPhone 6 be?

With the iPhone 6, presumably due sometime this fall, Apple will no doubt continue its focus on photography and on making the best "everyday" cameras in the business. There are several ways to do that. You can have a big piece of glass that takes up a lot of space but captures an incredible amount of information. You can have an amazing image signal processor (ISP) that takes what information is captured and makes incredible use of it. You can have killer software that takes the bits, analyzes and processes the pixels out of them, and creates incredible results. And you can have fantastic cloud services that take whatever comes out of the phone and applies incredible server-side power to it. In other words, in the glass, in the chip, in the apps, in the cloud. Nokia and its 41-megapixel Carl Zeiss lenses, Apple and their A-series processors, Samsung and their bevy of features, and Google and their auto-awesome servers are examples of all three approaches. So where can Apple and the iPhone 6 go next?

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Older Mac webcams can spy on you, but don't tape yours over until you read this

Two researchers at Johns Hopkins University published a paper that has recently been widely reported throughout the Mac blogosphere. They claim to have been able to hack the webcam on older MacBook and iMac computers so the camera worked without activating the green LED. Don't tape over your webcam yet, though. I've had a look over the paper, and it's not as bad as you might think.

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Retina iPad mini iSight and FaceTime HD camera tests

The iSight camera in the Retina mini remains unchanged from last year's original. It's still the same 5 megapixel, backside illuminated (BSI), five-element, hybrid IR file red, and f/2.4 aperture. What has changed is the Apple A7 processor inside, and the image signal processor (ISP) inside it. That's 2 generations ahead in terms of imaging technology, which includes auto white balance, focus, exposure, face-detection, and more. In daylight, when the sun is flooding it with photons, there won't be much if any difference. When it comes to low-light, however, the A7 ISP pulls a little more detail out of the darkness, same as the iPad Air, but certainly nowhere near as good as the superior optics in the iPhone 5s. So the question becomes, how good - or bad - is it?

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Apple reportedly buying PrimeSense, makers of original Xbox Kinect sensor tech

Apple is reportedly in the final stages of acquiring PrimeSense - the Israeli company whose sensor technology was used by Microsoft to create the original Kinect for Xbox 360 - for roughly $280 million. According to Calcalist (via Google Translate):

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iPad Air vs iPhone 5s: iSight and FaceTime camera shootout!

While the iPad Air now has the same, improved front-facing FaceTime HD camera as the iPhone 5s - and every other 2013 iOS device - its rear-facing iSight camera remains very much unchanged from the iPad 4 and original iPad mini. What has changed however is the software and hardware that power it. With iOS 7 and the very same Apple A7 found in the iPhone 5s - and the very same image signal processor (ISP) - the iPad Air could see an overall boost in quality anyway. To measure how it stacks up, we put the 5 megapixel iPad Air camera up against the 8 megapixel camera, not see if it would win - it doesn't have a chance - but to see how close it can come!

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iPhone 5s vs iPhone 5c vs iPhone 5: iSight camera shootout!

The iPhone 5s once again shows Apple's focus on cameras, bringing several improvements to the 8 megapixel iSight camera on the back. These include a dual LED white/yellow flash called True Tone, a larger f/2.2 aperture, bigger 1.5mm pixel sensor, and, of course, the next generation image signal processor (ISP) in the new Apple A7 chipset. What does this mean for overall, every day photo quality? What does it mean for skin tones and low-light? What does it mean for motion and dynamic range? And how does it compare to the also just-launched iPhone 5c and last year's similarly equipped iPhone 5? Let's take a look!

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iPhone 5s preview: iSight camera combines improved sensor, smarter image processor, makes everyone a better photographer

The iPhone 5s continues to showcase Apple's attention to their camera technology, iSight and FaceTime HD both. Once again hardware and software combine to create photos and video far better than the sum of their parts. That includes a bigger sensor with 1.5 micron pixels and an f/2.2 aperture. It's also includes an intelligent burst mode, a dual LED with white and amber elements, electronic image stabilization to reduce blur, and slow mo mode lets you record 720p video at a silky smooth 120fps. Here's how Apple describes it:

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