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Recording a fashion show with an iPhone seems easy compared to what a team of students from a school in Britain have done. With just a helium balloon, a GPS and a flight computer, they have managed to record incredible footage of the Earth. The project, which took over two years to fundraise and plan, resulted in over two-and-a-half hours of footage.

Students from Giles Academy outfitted an iPhone with a custom-built craft that included a helium balloon, GPS navigation unit and a flight computer to track the altitude. The phone reached 18 miles above the surface of the Earth and was able to capture more than two-and-a-half hours worth of footage before the balloon burst, after which the craft made its descent safely back to the surface with a parachute.

With the help of the GPS unit, the students were able to retrieve the iPhone and access the footage, which you can view at the source link below.

Source: Yahoo News

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There are 10 comments. Add yours.

Iphonejackson says:

I hope their carrier has good roaming rates.

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WinOMG says:

Lol Nokia 1020 and 41 megapixel camera is way better.

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kataran says:

Nice idea

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Hectorius says:

Nice

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Analog Spirit says:

Cool. It "boldly went where no phone has gone before."
It's nice to know that the iPhone can withstand the cold and vacuum of space and still function up there.

Analyss14 says:

"boldly went where no phone has gone before."

I don't often see this phrase without the split infinitive. Good job you.

Analog Spirit says:

I don't even know what a split infinitive is, but thank you anyway.

WPSteve says:

Good thing it didn't land in the ocean.

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