More photos of next gen iPhone shows off a new protective shield and vibrator assembly

New photos of what may be the next generation iPhone components show what could be a protective shield that would sit underneath the main digitizer and LCD assembly, and potentially add additional protection to components such as the logic board. The photos come by way of Nowhereelse.fr, and also show a vibrator assembly different from what is currently used in the iPhone 4S and CDMA iPhone 4.

More possible iPhone 5 component leaks

The picture above shows a couple of components that could surface in the next generation iPhone. While most are components we've already seen in previous leaks, there are some new additions. Most notably is the appearance of a new protective shield. While the current iPhone 4S and previous iPhone models have used individual shields to cover the dock connector and cable connectors, this shield is simliar to what you can already find in the 4th generation iPod touch.

Nowhereelse.fr is claiming that this shield will attach to the back of the display assembly. While that may be possible, a more logical assumption would be that it will sit below the display if the next gen iPhone opens from the front in order to protect internal components. The iPhone 4S and iPhone 4 both open from the back while older models such as the iPhone 3G and 3GS open from the front. It's possible that Apple may go back to the old method of opening the device from the front but I don't see that being likely unless they go with a design simliar to the current iPod touch.

Vibrator assembly in CDMA iPhone 4 and iPhone 4S

Also of note is the vibrator assembly in the photo. It lines up more with the type of assembly you can find in the GSM variant of the iPhone 4. The CDMA version and iPhone 4S both contain a different type of rotational assembly. Anyone who has owned both a GSM iPhone 4 and an iPhone 4S can notice the difference in vibration between the two. The iPhone 4S is not as harsh and has a smoother vibration due to the construction of the assembly. I can't see Apple returning to the older assembly type unless it's to save space inside the device.

While these parts could end up being legitimate, it seems likely that they may be earlier prototype parts that may not have actually made the final cut.

Source: Nowhereelse.fr via MacRumors