iPhone Gets Final Look from CrackBerry.com Kevin

The last iPhone review is up from Kevin of CrackBerry.com. It's a well-written review of the iPhone and he sides with me against Dieter that the iPhone is a smartphone, big ups there. It has some catching up to do, to be sure, but that's to be expected for a device that hasn't even been out 6 months yet. It sounds to me like he's been thinking about purchasing one. Kevin names the iPhone the champ of entertainment, and wonders why they didn't call it the iGadget -- the phone is treated as just another application of the phone. It's an interesting point, one I'll be addressing later with my triumphant "return to the iPhone" article.

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Reader comments

iPhone Gets Final Look from CrackBerry.com Kevin

5 Comments

do you think the iPhone is a smartphone: yes or no, no qualifications. :rolleyes:
Define smartphone without quibbles or qualifications so I can. :rolleyes: back atcha!

huh, we're having a meta-argument about whether the iPhone is a smartphone or not. I think that, in itself, proves my freakin point.
:cheers:

Is the iPhone a smartphone? Absolutely. It's just a different take on a smartphone. In some ways--OSX roots, interface, syncing, web browsing--it is far smarter than the other devices in this comparison.
From Wikipedia: "A smartphone is a mobile phone offering advanced capabilities beyond a typical mobile phone, often with personal computer like functionality. There is no industry standard definition of a smartphone. For some, a smartphone is a phone which runs complete operating system software providing a standardized interface and platform for application developers. For others, a smartphone is simply a phone with advanced features."
Kevin's comments that the iPhone is a slow communications device are interesting. I personally find the speed factor in rapid-fire text messages and emails to be counterproductive--they just fool people into thinking they are working. I much prefer quality over quantity and find constant interruptions to be annoying. I approve of a device that is better at listening and reading as opposed to talking and responding.
I just wish the iPhone had a replaceable battery and GPS receiver and was offered on other phone carriers. AT&T doesn't even cover my area.